Mik Gaspay
Curated Exhibition

Hidden

The virtual exhibition Hidden showcases a range of material, bodily, and sensorial artwork and literature that are tied to each other by their varied attempts at concealment. (Image left: Mik Gaspay, “Cover,” 2012, Print.)

Explore
CA+T Interviews

Denise Cruz

Cruz discusses her search for a Filipino literary archive, using Black Atlantic studies as a model, and the complications of Filipina nationalism.

Dialogues

Beyond the Horizon of Death?

Reflecting on the antecedents and aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda’s devastating landfall, Gina Apostol, Joi Barrios, Kale Fajardo, Dylan Rodriguez and Teresia Teaiwa layer a sea of ideas about the legacy of defeat, military occupation, racial genocide, and a Pacific coalition.

Opening

Queer Sights and Sounds

Queer Sites and Sounds is open at ARTSblock in Riverside, CA, through Nov 1, 2014!

curated exhibition

Hidden

The virtual exhibition Hidden showcases a range of material, bodily, and sensorial artwork and literature that are tied to each other by their varied attempts at concealment. We associate the word “hidden” with bodies or objects that cannot be seen—things out of sight and perhaps out of mind. But each of these works visually or viscerally transmits the sense that there are mysterious presences hidden or in hiding. 
 
These works invite us to tease out the details and structures that have facilitated their concealment. What is purportedly hidden then emerges in plain sight. Collectively, the works in Hidden capture “absent presences.” 
 
During the conceptual stages of Hidden, I was influenced by stories of the undocumented in the United States, and I thought about my own family’s connection to this issue. I grew up abroad, and the knowledge that some family members were “TNT” an acronym for tago ng tago or “undocumented migrants” in the United States was always present in our household. Their stories and their existence were known to all of us, but they remained hidden from society writ large. 
 
Only later did I realize that their presence and visibility in our lives came with tremendous stakes. If caught as undocumented, they could have been detained or deported back to the Philippines. When I read about the undocumented, I think about my relatives and how their lives connect to other bodies, communities, spaces, feelings, and survival strategies.
 
I hope that Hidden helps to answer questions that continue to linger: What does it mean to be hidden? What forces govern the in/visibility of people or spaces? How do artists and writers conceptualize the spectral, both phantasms and memories?
 
Curated by Jan Christian Bernabe 
September 2014
 
Special thanks to my curatorial assistant intern: Tanya Tran
 
Over the course of several weeks, work from the following artists and writers will unfold on CA+T’s website. Maraming salamat to all the contributors to Hidden.
 
Kimberly Arteche, Lek Borja, Marylene Camacho, Carina A. del Rosario, John Yoyogi Fortes, Mik Gaspay, Luisa A. Igloria, Farsad Labbauf, Lin + Lam, Kang Seung Lee, Jessica Lichtenstein, Senalka McDonald,  Michelle Peñaloza, Barbra Ramos, Chris Sicat, Jeffrey Augustine Songco, Laura Swanson, Kenneth Tam, Maria Villote
 
Hidden was made possible through the generous support of donors.
 

Open for Business

Mik Gaspay

2012 Print. Variable dimensions. Courtesy of the artist.

contributor

X

Mik Gaspay

image description
  • See All Works
  • resume/cv
  • visit website

Mik Gaspay is an interdisciplinary artist who primarily works with found objects, painting and sculpture. His practice investigates translated meanings of commonplace products and structures: drawing from the tension between functionality, purpose and language he conjures up expressions fused from readymade signification, history and uncertainty. His work queries for meanings embedded in the materials within objects we consume and encompass our lives with.

Mik Gaspay was born in Quezon City, Philippines and migrated to Palo Alto, California at the age of 9. He received a B.F.A. in Illustration/Design from the California College of Arts and Crafts and later attended the California College of the Arts for his M.F.A. He currently lives and works in San Francisco, California.

location

X
  • Born: Quezon City, Philippines
  • Based: San Francisco, CA, USA

comments

X

Cover

Mik Gaspay

2012 Print. 50 in. x 36 in. Courtesy of the artist.

contributor

X

Mik Gaspay

image description
  • See All Works
  • resume/cv
  • visit website

Mik Gaspay is an interdisciplinary artist who primarily works with found objects, painting and sculpture. His practice investigates translated meanings of commonplace products and structures: drawing from the tension between functionality, purpose and language he conjures up expressions fused from readymade signification, history and uncertainty. His work queries for meanings embedded in the materials within objects we consume and encompass our lives with.

Mik Gaspay was born in Quezon City, Philippines and migrated to Palo Alto, California at the age of 9. He received a B.F.A. in Illustration/Design from the California College of Arts and Crafts and later attended the California College of the Arts for his M.F.A. He currently lives and works in San Francisco, California.

location

X
  • Born: Quezon City, Philippines
  • Based: San Francisco, CA, USA

comments

X

The Secret Language

Luisa A. Igloria

1992 Poem. Courtesy of Luisa A. Igloria. Cartographies. Manila: Anvil.

contributor

X

Luisa A. Igloria

b. 1961
image description
  • See All Works
  • facebook
  • visit website

Luisa A. Igloria grew up in Baguio City, in the northern Cordillera, Philippines. She earned her doctorate from the University of Illinois at Chicago, her M.A. in Literature from Ateneo de Manila University (where she wrote a thesis on Foucault and the discourse of power in colonial texts pertaining to the Igorot), and her B.A. Humanities (cum laude) from the University of the Philippines, Baguio. Since November 20, 2010, she has written (at least) a poem a day, and these are archived at Dave Bonta’s Via Negativa site. Luisa is the author of Ode to the Heart Smaller than a Pencil Eraser (Utah State University Press, 2014), which was selected by Mark Doty for the 2014 May Swenson Poetry Prize; Night Willow (Phoenicia Publishing, 2014); Juan Luna’s Revolver (University of Notre Dame Press, 2009), which won the Ernest Sandeen Prize; Trill & Mordent (WordTech Editions, 2005); and eight other books. She currently directs the M.F.A. Creative Writing Program at Old Dominion University.

 

Photograph by John-Henry Doucette.

The space of writing is the space of improvisation, curiosity, invention, experiment--- Here is where the mind’s veering and suggestive tilt can be brought to bear on meanings and connections other than those that are “given”; this to me seems the most fertile condition for poetry. As a woman, and as a writer of color in the diaspora, this perspective is additionally relevant when I consider the ways in which histories are typically written by those who have access to the most power. To improvise is to engage in little revolutions, is to overturn the sense of given expectations. This kind of virtuosity can be a source of great creative and political power.

location

X
  • Born: Makati, Philippines
  • Based: Baguio City, Philippines
  • Also Based in: Norfolk, VA, USA

comments

X

In the Clothing Archive

Luisa A. Igloria

2009 Poem. Courtesy of Luisa A. Igloria. from Juan Luna's Revolver, University of Notre Dame Press.

contributor

X

Luisa A. Igloria

b. 1961
image description
  • See All Works
  • facebook
  • visit website

Luisa A. Igloria grew up in Baguio City, in the northern Cordillera, Philippines. She earned her doctorate from the University of Illinois at Chicago, her M.A. in Literature from Ateneo de Manila University (where she wrote a thesis on Foucault and the discourse of power in colonial texts pertaining to the Igorot), and her B.A. Humanities (cum laude) from the University of the Philippines, Baguio. Since November 20, 2010, she has written (at least) a poem a day, and these are archived at Dave Bonta’s Via Negativa site. Luisa is the author of Ode to the Heart Smaller than a Pencil Eraser (Utah State University Press, 2014), which was selected by Mark Doty for the 2014 May Swenson Poetry Prize; Night Willow (Phoenicia Publishing, 2014); Juan Luna’s Revolver (University of Notre Dame Press, 2009), which won the Ernest Sandeen Prize; Trill & Mordent (WordTech Editions, 2005); and eight other books. She currently directs the M.F.A. Creative Writing Program at Old Dominion University.

 

Photograph by John-Henry Doucette.

The space of writing is the space of improvisation, curiosity, invention, experiment--- Here is where the mind’s veering and suggestive tilt can be brought to bear on meanings and connections other than those that are “given”; this to me seems the most fertile condition for poetry. As a woman, and as a writer of color in the diaspora, this perspective is additionally relevant when I consider the ways in which histories are typically written by those who have access to the most power. To improvise is to engage in little revolutions, is to overturn the sense of given expectations. This kind of virtuosity can be a source of great creative and political power.

location

X
  • Born: Makati, Philippines
  • Based: Baguio City, Philippines
  • Also Based in: Norfolk, VA, USA

comments

X