Do Ho Suh
Curated Exhibition

RaceCraft

This group exhibition explores the racial politics of the contemporary craft movement. Left: Do Ho Suh, “The Perfect Home II,” 2003.

Explore
Topic

Citizenship & Belonging

Explore works like Lin + Lam's "This Is Not Me" installation.

Commissioned Work

Poetry by Soultree

Read poems like "Sana Ako Na Lang [I wish it were me instead]" that Soultree (Stephanie Camba) wrote for CA+T.

 

Dialogues

Break, Burn, Hoard: For an Atlas of Lost Afro-Asian Worlds

Over the course of Break, Burn, Hoard, Vince Schleitwiler and Tamiko Nimura speculate on "taking the imagination seriously as a historical force." Join them!

curated exhibition

RaceCraft

Slow. Sustainable. DIY. Green. Local. Anti-mainstream.
These are the ideals that drive the popularity of the contemporary craft movement. But what is rendered invisible in the celebration of craft as a means of social change?
 
Where and how does race intersect with craft practices and craft discourse?
 
The artists and writers in this exhibition foreground alternative practices and genealogies. They make visible the neoliberal underpinnings of the contemporary craft movement. They reveal how craft is marked by race, heteropatriarchy and colonization, and they challenge an environmental politics founded on sustaining whiteness.
 
In RaceCraft, being “crafty” is not just aptitude and a lifestyle choice. It is artful subterfuge in the face of racial constraints.
 
Co-curated by Marie Lo and Sarita Echavez See.
 
Contributors’ works will be published in staggered waves from late October to mid-November 2015, after which the whole exhibition will be archived permanently here on CA+T’s website.
 
Contributors include: Kimberly Alidio, Aram Han, Kiam Marcelo Junio, Bovey Lee, Kang Seung Lee, Marie Lo, Tim Manalo, Alfred Marasigan, Do Ho Suh, Stephanie Syjuco, Namita Wiggers, and Kristina Wong. 
 
Special thanks to Jan Christian Bernabe for curatorial guidance; Martina Dorff and Gian Dionisio for research and clerical assistance; and the California Institute of Contemporary Arts for fiscal support.
 
Fall 2015

Ironing Oceans

Bovey Lee

2011 Chinese xuan (rice) paper on silk, hand cut Courtesy of Bovey Lee

contributor

X

Bovey Lee

image description
  • See All Works
  • facebook
  • visit website

I am a cut paper artist currently based in Los Angeles, California, USA. Born in Hong Kong and having practiced Chinese calligraphy since the age of ten, I studied painting and drawing in my formative years and completed my B.A. degree in Fine Arts at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. In 1993, I came to the United States as a painter and earned my first Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of California at Berkeley. Subsequently, I earned a second M.F.A. in computer graphics and interactive media at Pratt Institute in New York in 1999. From 2000-2014, I lived and worked in Pittsburgh where I created my first cut paper work in summer 2005. Since 2008, I have maintained a full-time studio practice. Exhibitions include Museum Kunst der Westkueste, Foehr, Germany; Museum of Craft & Design, San Francisco; Nevada Museum of Art; Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum, Arizona; Cornell Museum of Art & American Culture, Delray Beach, Florida; Wing Luke Museum, Seattle, Washington; Brooklyn Museum of Art; Shelburne Museum, Vermont; Museum Bellerive, Zurich, Switzerland; National Glass Centre, Sunderland, UK; Blackburn Museum, UK; Museum of Fine Arts, Beijing, China; Fukuoka Museum of Art, Japan; Hong Kong Museum of Art; Museum Rijswijk, The Netherlands; among others. Over a dozen books featuring my cut paper include Paper Secret I&II (Hightone, Guangzhou); Paper Play (Sandu, Guangzhou); Freehand (Chronicle Book, San Francisco); 500 Paper Objects (Lark Crafts, Asheville); Art of Paper (Monsa, Barcelona); Paradise of Paper Art (Designerbooks, Beijing); Material World (Virgin Books, London); Paper Works (Sandu, Guangzhou); Push Paper (Lark Books, New York); l’art de la decoupe (Editions Alternatives, Paris); The New Encyclopedia of Origami and Papercraft Techniques (Quarto, London); and High Touch, Illusive 3, Papercraft 2, and Papercraft (Gestalten, Berlin). Institutional collections include the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology, Oxford University, UK; Pacific Asia Museum, Pasadena, California; Hong Kong Museum of Art; The Chinese University of Hong Kong; BNY Mellon Corporate Art Collection; Fidelity Corporate Art Collection; Headland Capital Partners, Greater China & Asia; Park Hyatt Sanya, China; and Progressive Corporate Art Collection. Corporate commissions and editorials include Lancome, China; APM, Hong Kong; The Washington Post; Panasonic; The New York Times Magazine; Art@Government Buildings, Hong Kong; Hugo Boss; Pacific Place, Hong Kong; F.P. Journe; and Annabelle Magazine, Switzerland; among others. Grotto Fine Art in Hong Kong; Rena Bransten Gallery in San Francisco, California; and Gavlak Gallery in Palm Beach, Florida and Los Angeles, California represent my works. Selected works are also available at Fost Gallery, Singapore.

My hand cut paper explores the tension between man and the environment in the context of power, sacrifice, and survival. These three “motivators,” as I call them, drive all our desires and behaviors toward one another and the environment. We live in a time when we overdo everything from technology to urbanization to consumption. My recent work is informed by our precarious relationship with nature in the twenty-first century, i.e., what we do to the environment with our super machines and technologies and what nature does back to us in reaction. I hand cut each work on a single sheet of Chinese xuan (rice) paper backed with silk; both are renewable and eco-friendly materials. The tools I use are simple: a cutting mat, an X-acto knife and blades, staples, clips, and paperweights. Before the final hand cutting process, I compose the images using the computer and software. I then print out the digital images and use them to cut with. The images are photographic and I translate them into patterns of solid and void, while cutting free-hand without any rulers or stencils. My work is like drawing with a knife and is rooted in my study of Chinese calligraphy and pencil drawing. Cutting paper is a visceral reaction and natural response to my affection for immediacy, detail, and subtlety. The physical and mental demand from cutting is extreme and thrilling; it slows me down and allows me to think clearly and decisively.

location

X
  • Born: Hong Kong, China
  • Based: Los Angeles, CA, USA

comments

X

Ironing Oceans (detail)

Bovey Lee

2011 Chinese xuan (rice) paper on silk, hand cut Courtesy of Bovey Lee

contributor

X

Bovey Lee

image description
  • See All Works
  • facebook
  • visit website

I am a cut paper artist currently based in Los Angeles, California, USA. Born in Hong Kong and having practiced Chinese calligraphy since the age of ten, I studied painting and drawing in my formative years and completed my B.A. degree in Fine Arts at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. In 1993, I came to the United States as a painter and earned my first Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of California at Berkeley. Subsequently, I earned a second M.F.A. in computer graphics and interactive media at Pratt Institute in New York in 1999. From 2000-2014, I lived and worked in Pittsburgh where I created my first cut paper work in summer 2005. Since 2008, I have maintained a full-time studio practice. Exhibitions include Museum Kunst der Westkueste, Foehr, Germany; Museum of Craft & Design, San Francisco; Nevada Museum of Art; Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum, Arizona; Cornell Museum of Art & American Culture, Delray Beach, Florida; Wing Luke Museum, Seattle, Washington; Brooklyn Museum of Art; Shelburne Museum, Vermont; Museum Bellerive, Zurich, Switzerland; National Glass Centre, Sunderland, UK; Blackburn Museum, UK; Museum of Fine Arts, Beijing, China; Fukuoka Museum of Art, Japan; Hong Kong Museum of Art; Museum Rijswijk, The Netherlands; among others. Over a dozen books featuring my cut paper include Paper Secret I&II (Hightone, Guangzhou); Paper Play (Sandu, Guangzhou); Freehand (Chronicle Book, San Francisco); 500 Paper Objects (Lark Crafts, Asheville); Art of Paper (Monsa, Barcelona); Paradise of Paper Art (Designerbooks, Beijing); Material World (Virgin Books, London); Paper Works (Sandu, Guangzhou); Push Paper (Lark Books, New York); l’art de la decoupe (Editions Alternatives, Paris); The New Encyclopedia of Origami and Papercraft Techniques (Quarto, London); and High Touch, Illusive 3, Papercraft 2, and Papercraft (Gestalten, Berlin). Institutional collections include the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology, Oxford University, UK; Pacific Asia Museum, Pasadena, California; Hong Kong Museum of Art; The Chinese University of Hong Kong; BNY Mellon Corporate Art Collection; Fidelity Corporate Art Collection; Headland Capital Partners, Greater China & Asia; Park Hyatt Sanya, China; and Progressive Corporate Art Collection. Corporate commissions and editorials include Lancome, China; APM, Hong Kong; The Washington Post; Panasonic; The New York Times Magazine; Art@Government Buildings, Hong Kong; Hugo Boss; Pacific Place, Hong Kong; F.P. Journe; and Annabelle Magazine, Switzerland; among others. Grotto Fine Art in Hong Kong; Rena Bransten Gallery in San Francisco, California; and Gavlak Gallery in Palm Beach, Florida and Los Angeles, California represent my works. Selected works are also available at Fost Gallery, Singapore.

My hand cut paper explores the tension between man and the environment in the context of power, sacrifice, and survival. These three “motivators,” as I call them, drive all our desires and behaviors toward one another and the environment. We live in a time when we overdo everything from technology to urbanization to consumption. My recent work is informed by our precarious relationship with nature in the twenty-first century, i.e., what we do to the environment with our super machines and technologies and what nature does back to us in reaction. I hand cut each work on a single sheet of Chinese xuan (rice) paper backed with silk; both are renewable and eco-friendly materials. The tools I use are simple: a cutting mat, an X-acto knife and blades, staples, clips, and paperweights. Before the final hand cutting process, I compose the images using the computer and software. I then print out the digital images and use them to cut with. The images are photographic and I translate them into patterns of solid and void, while cutting free-hand without any rulers or stencils. My work is like drawing with a knife and is rooted in my study of Chinese calligraphy and pencil drawing. Cutting paper is a visceral reaction and natural response to my affection for immediacy, detail, and subtlety. The physical and mental demand from cutting is extreme and thrilling; it slows me down and allows me to think clearly and decisively.

location

X
  • Born: Hong Kong, China
  • Based: Los Angeles, CA, USA

comments

X

Ironing Oceans (detail)

Bovey Lee

2011 Chinese xuan (rice) paper on silk, hand cut Courtesy of Bovey Lee

contributor

X

Bovey Lee

image description
  • See All Works
  • facebook
  • visit website

I am a cut paper artist currently based in Los Angeles, California, USA. Born in Hong Kong and having practiced Chinese calligraphy since the age of ten, I studied painting and drawing in my formative years and completed my B.A. degree in Fine Arts at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. In 1993, I came to the United States as a painter and earned my first Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of California at Berkeley. Subsequently, I earned a second M.F.A. in computer graphics and interactive media at Pratt Institute in New York in 1999. From 2000-2014, I lived and worked in Pittsburgh where I created my first cut paper work in summer 2005. Since 2008, I have maintained a full-time studio practice. Exhibitions include Museum Kunst der Westkueste, Foehr, Germany; Museum of Craft & Design, San Francisco; Nevada Museum of Art; Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum, Arizona; Cornell Museum of Art & American Culture, Delray Beach, Florida; Wing Luke Museum, Seattle, Washington; Brooklyn Museum of Art; Shelburne Museum, Vermont; Museum Bellerive, Zurich, Switzerland; National Glass Centre, Sunderland, UK; Blackburn Museum, UK; Museum of Fine Arts, Beijing, China; Fukuoka Museum of Art, Japan; Hong Kong Museum of Art; Museum Rijswijk, The Netherlands; among others. Over a dozen books featuring my cut paper include Paper Secret I&II (Hightone, Guangzhou); Paper Play (Sandu, Guangzhou); Freehand (Chronicle Book, San Francisco); 500 Paper Objects (Lark Crafts, Asheville); Art of Paper (Monsa, Barcelona); Paradise of Paper Art (Designerbooks, Beijing); Material World (Virgin Books, London); Paper Works (Sandu, Guangzhou); Push Paper (Lark Books, New York); l’art de la decoupe (Editions Alternatives, Paris); The New Encyclopedia of Origami and Papercraft Techniques (Quarto, London); and High Touch, Illusive 3, Papercraft 2, and Papercraft (Gestalten, Berlin). Institutional collections include the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology, Oxford University, UK; Pacific Asia Museum, Pasadena, California; Hong Kong Museum of Art; The Chinese University of Hong Kong; BNY Mellon Corporate Art Collection; Fidelity Corporate Art Collection; Headland Capital Partners, Greater China & Asia; Park Hyatt Sanya, China; and Progressive Corporate Art Collection. Corporate commissions and editorials include Lancome, China; APM, Hong Kong; The Washington Post; Panasonic; The New York Times Magazine; Art@Government Buildings, Hong Kong; Hugo Boss; Pacific Place, Hong Kong; F.P. Journe; and Annabelle Magazine, Switzerland; among others. Grotto Fine Art in Hong Kong; Rena Bransten Gallery in San Francisco, California; and Gavlak Gallery in Palm Beach, Florida and Los Angeles, California represent my works. Selected works are also available at Fost Gallery, Singapore.

My hand cut paper explores the tension between man and the environment in the context of power, sacrifice, and survival. These three “motivators,” as I call them, drive all our desires and behaviors toward one another and the environment. We live in a time when we overdo everything from technology to urbanization to consumption. My recent work is informed by our precarious relationship with nature in the twenty-first century, i.e., what we do to the environment with our super machines and technologies and what nature does back to us in reaction. I hand cut each work on a single sheet of Chinese xuan (rice) paper backed with silk; both are renewable and eco-friendly materials. The tools I use are simple: a cutting mat, an X-acto knife and blades, staples, clips, and paperweights. Before the final hand cutting process, I compose the images using the computer and software. I then print out the digital images and use them to cut with. The images are photographic and I translate them into patterns of solid and void, while cutting free-hand without any rulers or stencils. My work is like drawing with a knife and is rooted in my study of Chinese calligraphy and pencil drawing. Cutting paper is a visceral reaction and natural response to my affection for immediacy, detail, and subtlety. The physical and mental demand from cutting is extreme and thrilling; it slows me down and allows me to think clearly and decisively.

location

X
  • Born: Hong Kong, China
  • Based: Los Angeles, CA, USA

comments

X

SHAPING AND EDGING

Kimberly Alidio

2015 Poetry Kimberly Alidio

contributor

X

Kimberly Alidio

b. 1971
image description
  • See All Works
  • visit website

Kimberly Alidio is a high school teacher, a tenure-track dropout and the author of a poetry collection, After projects the resound (Black Radish, 2016) and a chapbook, solitude being alien (dancing girl press, 2013). Born in West Baltimore and raised in Baltimore County, Maryland, she lives in East Austin, Texas.

location

X
  • Born: Baltimore, MD, USA
  • Based: Austin, TX, USA

comments

X

Imperial Floods

Tim Manalo

2015 Sculpture/installation 6 ft. x 6 ft. x 12 ft. Courtesy of Tim Manalo

contributor

X

Tim Manalo

b. 1988
image description
  • See All Works
  • facebook

Tim Manalo was born and raised in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Growing up in a city rich with multiculturalism, he has always been exposed to Philippine culture through the city’s large Filipino community. A graduate of OCAD University’s sculpture and installation program, Manalo explores ideas of hybridity and identity in his works. He has an extensive background as a sculptor and fabricator for companies, catering industries focused in interior design, commercial outdoor displays, and costume and props. Currently, he continues his art practice in the heart of downtown Toronto. He is also very involved with the Filipino arts community, volunteering as an arts-based workshop facilitator for newcomer and at-risk Filipino youth.

In the piece Balut, I reflect on my position as someone who was born and raised in Canada but whose parents originated from the Philippines. This work is about my Filipino upbringing conflicting with the Westernized norm that I was confronted with during lunchtime in elementary school. Because Filipino dishes were not recognized as mainstream food, it resulted in my Filipino shame as a child as I would try to assimilate to the culture of the classroom. Balut is a hard-boiled duck fetus egg. In the Philippines it’s a popular delicacy, but in North America it’s a taboo. Balut in Tagalog also translates as “pack up” in English, which goes back to the origins of my Filipino upbringing and family migrating from the Philippines. Mimicking the light box used in harvesting balut eggs, the light inside the bag’s hole turns on only when it’s daytime in the Philippines and turns off when it’s nighttime—a daily reminder of our connection to a homeland that helped raise us, especially through food.

location

X
  • Born: Toronto, ON, Canada
  • Based: Toronto, ON, Canada

comments

X

Imperial Floods (detail)

Tim Manalo

2015 Sculpture/installation 6 ft. x 6 ft. x 12 ft. Courtesy of Tim Manalo

contributor

X

Tim Manalo

b. 1988
image description
  • See All Works
  • facebook

Tim Manalo was born and raised in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Growing up in a city rich with multiculturalism, he has always been exposed to Philippine culture through the city’s large Filipino community. A graduate of OCAD University’s sculpture and installation program, Manalo explores ideas of hybridity and identity in his works. He has an extensive background as a sculptor and fabricator for companies, catering industries focused in interior design, commercial outdoor displays, and costume and props. Currently, he continues his art practice in the heart of downtown Toronto. He is also very involved with the Filipino arts community, volunteering as an arts-based workshop facilitator for newcomer and at-risk Filipino youth.

In the piece Balut, I reflect on my position as someone who was born and raised in Canada but whose parents originated from the Philippines. This work is about my Filipino upbringing conflicting with the Westernized norm that I was confronted with during lunchtime in elementary school. Because Filipino dishes were not recognized as mainstream food, it resulted in my Filipino shame as a child as I would try to assimilate to the culture of the classroom. Balut is a hard-boiled duck fetus egg. In the Philippines it’s a popular delicacy, but in North America it’s a taboo. Balut in Tagalog also translates as “pack up” in English, which goes back to the origins of my Filipino upbringing and family migrating from the Philippines. Mimicking the light box used in harvesting balut eggs, the light inside the bag’s hole turns on only when it’s daytime in the Philippines and turns off when it’s nighttime—a daily reminder of our connection to a homeland that helped raise us, especially through food.

location

X
  • Born: Toronto, ON, Canada
  • Based: Toronto, ON, Canada

comments

X

Imperial Floods (detail)

Tim Manalo

2015 Sculpture/installation 6 ft. x 6 ft. x 12 ft. Courtesy of Tim Manalo

contributor

X

Tim Manalo

b. 1988
image description
  • See All Works
  • facebook

Tim Manalo was born and raised in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Growing up in a city rich with multiculturalism, he has always been exposed to Philippine culture through the city’s large Filipino community. A graduate of OCAD University’s sculpture and installation program, Manalo explores ideas of hybridity and identity in his works. He has an extensive background as a sculptor and fabricator for companies, catering industries focused in interior design, commercial outdoor displays, and costume and props. Currently, he continues his art practice in the heart of downtown Toronto. He is also very involved with the Filipino arts community, volunteering as an arts-based workshop facilitator for newcomer and at-risk Filipino youth.

In the piece Balut, I reflect on my position as someone who was born and raised in Canada but whose parents originated from the Philippines. This work is about my Filipino upbringing conflicting with the Westernized norm that I was confronted with during lunchtime in elementary school. Because Filipino dishes were not recognized as mainstream food, it resulted in my Filipino shame as a child as I would try to assimilate to the culture of the classroom. Balut is a hard-boiled duck fetus egg. In the Philippines it’s a popular delicacy, but in North America it’s a taboo. Balut in Tagalog also translates as “pack up” in English, which goes back to the origins of my Filipino upbringing and family migrating from the Philippines. Mimicking the light box used in harvesting balut eggs, the light inside the bag’s hole turns on only when it’s daytime in the Philippines and turns off when it’s nighttime—a daily reminder of our connection to a homeland that helped raise us, especially through food.

location

X
  • Born: Toronto, ON, Canada
  • Based: Toronto, ON, Canada

comments

X

Imperial Floods (detail)

Tim Manalo

2015 Sculpture/installation 6 ft. x 6 ft. x 12 ft. Courtesy of Tim Manalo

contributor

X

Tim Manalo

b. 1988
image description
  • See All Works
  • facebook

Tim Manalo was born and raised in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Growing up in a city rich with multiculturalism, he has always been exposed to Philippine culture through the city’s large Filipino community. A graduate of OCAD University’s sculpture and installation program, Manalo explores ideas of hybridity and identity in his works. He has an extensive background as a sculptor and fabricator for companies, catering industries focused in interior design, commercial outdoor displays, and costume and props. Currently, he continues his art practice in the heart of downtown Toronto. He is also very involved with the Filipino arts community, volunteering as an arts-based workshop facilitator for newcomer and at-risk Filipino youth.

In the piece Balut, I reflect on my position as someone who was born and raised in Canada but whose parents originated from the Philippines. This work is about my Filipino upbringing conflicting with the Westernized norm that I was confronted with during lunchtime in elementary school. Because Filipino dishes were not recognized as mainstream food, it resulted in my Filipino shame as a child as I would try to assimilate to the culture of the classroom. Balut is a hard-boiled duck fetus egg. In the Philippines it’s a popular delicacy, but in North America it’s a taboo. Balut in Tagalog also translates as “pack up” in English, which goes back to the origins of my Filipino upbringing and family migrating from the Philippines. Mimicking the light box used in harvesting balut eggs, the light inside the bag’s hole turns on only when it’s daytime in the Philippines and turns off when it’s nighttime—a daily reminder of our connection to a homeland that helped raise us, especially through food.

location

X
  • Born: Toronto, ON, Canada
  • Based: Toronto, ON, Canada

comments

X

Imperial Floods (detail)

Tim Manalo

2015 Sculpture/installation 6 ft. x 6 ft. x 12 ft. Courtesy of Tim Manalo

contributor

X

Tim Manalo

b. 1988
image description
  • See All Works
  • facebook

Tim Manalo was born and raised in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Growing up in a city rich with multiculturalism, he has always been exposed to Philippine culture through the city’s large Filipino community. A graduate of OCAD University’s sculpture and installation program, Manalo explores ideas of hybridity and identity in his works. He has an extensive background as a sculptor and fabricator for companies, catering industries focused in interior design, commercial outdoor displays, and costume and props. Currently, he continues his art practice in the heart of downtown Toronto. He is also very involved with the Filipino arts community, volunteering as an arts-based workshop facilitator for newcomer and at-risk Filipino youth.

In the piece Balut, I reflect on my position as someone who was born and raised in Canada but whose parents originated from the Philippines. This work is about my Filipino upbringing conflicting with the Westernized norm that I was confronted with during lunchtime in elementary school. Because Filipino dishes were not recognized as mainstream food, it resulted in my Filipino shame as a child as I would try to assimilate to the culture of the classroom. Balut is a hard-boiled duck fetus egg. In the Philippines it’s a popular delicacy, but in North America it’s a taboo. Balut in Tagalog also translates as “pack up” in English, which goes back to the origins of my Filipino upbringing and family migrating from the Philippines. Mimicking the light box used in harvesting balut eggs, the light inside the bag’s hole turns on only when it’s daytime in the Philippines and turns off when it’s nighttime—a daily reminder of our connection to a homeland that helped raise us, especially through food.

location

X
  • Born: Toronto, ON, Canada
  • Based: Toronto, ON, Canada

comments

X

Imperial Floods

Tim Manalo

2015 Sculpture/installation 6 ft. x 6 ft. x 12 ft. Courtesy of Tim Manalo

contributor

X

Tim Manalo

b. 1988
image description
  • See All Works
  • facebook

Tim Manalo was born and raised in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Growing up in a city rich with multiculturalism, he has always been exposed to Philippine culture through the city’s large Filipino community. A graduate of OCAD University’s sculpture and installation program, Manalo explores ideas of hybridity and identity in his works. He has an extensive background as a sculptor and fabricator for companies, catering industries focused in interior design, commercial outdoor displays, and costume and props. Currently, he continues his art practice in the heart of downtown Toronto. He is also very involved with the Filipino arts community, volunteering as an arts-based workshop facilitator for newcomer and at-risk Filipino youth.

In the piece Balut, I reflect on my position as someone who was born and raised in Canada but whose parents originated from the Philippines. This work is about my Filipino upbringing conflicting with the Westernized norm that I was confronted with during lunchtime in elementary school. Because Filipino dishes were not recognized as mainstream food, it resulted in my Filipino shame as a child as I would try to assimilate to the culture of the classroom. Balut is a hard-boiled duck fetus egg. In the Philippines it’s a popular delicacy, but in North America it’s a taboo. Balut in Tagalog also translates as “pack up” in English, which goes back to the origins of my Filipino upbringing and family migrating from the Philippines. Mimicking the light box used in harvesting balut eggs, the light inside the bag’s hole turns on only when it’s daytime in the Philippines and turns off when it’s nighttime—a daily reminder of our connection to a homeland that helped raise us, especially through food.

location

X
  • Born: Toronto, ON, Canada
  • Based: Toronto, ON, Canada

comments

X