Behavior Design

www.behaviordesign.com [email removed]
image description

The Center for Art + Thought website was created and designed in partnership with Behavior Design. Behavior worked hand-in-hand with CA+T as a strategic partner and collaborator to envision a compelling online user experience for the organization to support CA+T's ambitious mission. Behavior worked closely with CA+T's Founder and core staff to develop a new space for content curation, exploration, and dialogue. At the core of the interface is ability to tell multiple stories based on various content groupings, and enable cross-pollination of works, people and ideas. And most importantly, the virtual experience was geared to support an intermixing of forms of expression within both art and scholarship (i.e. video, images, text, conversation) in a thoughtful and seamless way.

 

Mimi Young, CA+T Advisor/Collaborator

Mimi is a Founding Partner and Managing Director at Behavior Design. As a strategic advisor to the Center for Art + Thought, Mimi provides guidance on content strategy, user experience and organizational matters. At Behavior, Mimi has provided executive oversight and relationship building for a number of non profit and commercial clients including: The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, American Museum of Natural History, Museum of Modern Art, The New Victory Theater, HBO, Oprah Winfrey Network, E*Trade, JPMorgan Chase and Unilever, to name a few. Before starting Behavior, Mimi was the National Head of Design Technology at Rare Medium, Inc. Mimi is also engaged in the Arts, with museum curatorial experience at institutions such as the New Museum of Contemporary Art, International Center of Photography, and the Santa Monica Museum of Art. Some of her published editorial works include “Why Asia: Contemporary Asian and Asian American Art” by Alice Yang (NYU Press) and “Temporarily Possessed: The Semi-Permanent Collection” (The New Museum of Contemporary Art). As a practicing artist, Mimi's art work has been shown at the Bronx Museum of the Arts, Artists Space, and the Alternative Museum, among other venues. Mimi was also Rockefeller Foundation Fellowship Nominee for her online project entitled “Homing-In.” Mimi received her MFA degree in Computer Art at the School of Visual Arts, and her BFA degree in sculpture from the Rhode Island School of Design. 

 

Jeff Piazza, CA+T Advisor/Collaborator

Jeff is a Founding Partner and Creative Director at Behavior. As a strategic advisor to the Center for Art + Thought, Jeff oversees the user experience and creative direction for the website. As practice lead for the User Experience Design discipline, Jeff guides the creative vision on projects for such clients as HBO, Oprah Winfrey Network, National Geographic Channel, American Museum of Natural History, Cablevision, BusinessWeek, The New York Times and JPMorgan Chase. Prior to founding Behavior, Jeff worked as a broadcast designer at CBS and in marketing and promotions at Hearst Publications. His growing interest in interactive media brought him to the pioneering design studio i/o 360 followed by Rare Medium where he worked as a lead designer for such top brands as Microsoft and XM Satellite Radio. Jeff has spoken at events for the American Institute of Graphic Arts and Edgewise and has been a guest critic for Parsons School of Design. His award-winning work has been featured in such publications as Communication Arts, .Net, Print, and Graphis. Jeff also co-designed “Text.ure,” an interactive nonlinear storytelling experiment that has been inducted into the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s permanent collection. “Text.ure” went on to receive the Silver Medal Award for the I.D. Magazine Interactive Media Design Review. Jeff received his BFA from The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art and graduated with a concentrated study in design and photography.

 

Behavior Project Team

Mimi Young - Content/UX Strategy

Jeff Piazza - UX/Creative Direction

Heather Shoon - Visual Design

Matthew Knight - Technology

David William - Project Management

curated exhibition

Queer Horizons

Queer Horizons features the work of Asian American and Asian diasporic artists whose work envisions a queer future that unsettles the past, disrupts the present, and imagines new worlds beyond the limits of the horizon.

 

We take inspiration from José Esteban Muñoz, the late queer studies scholar, and his conception of a “not yet here.” As he explains in Cruising Utopia, the “not yet here” is a phenomenon of queer futurity that “allows us to see and feel beyond the quagmire of the present.”

 

Within the last ten years in the US, we have celebrated the legal recognition of same-sex marriage, the end of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” and the formal acceptance of gays in the military, and increased visibility of LGBTQ bodies and personalities in popular culture. In our present moment, however, LGBTQ rights, safety, and health care are increasingly under threat. Simultaneously, the current administration frames Asian American communities as “un-American,” the after tremors along old Yellow Peril fault lines. They are foreign, unassimilable, undocumented: Muslim “terrorists,” hordes of H1B visa techie taking over American jobs, or “model minority” students taking up too much space in classrooms.

 

However, the artists and works in Queer Horizons name a possibility beyond the "model minority”: as queer Asian American artists, they disrupt the model minority narrative defined by heteronormative notions of success. Each artist engages a non-linear temporality moving between pasts, presents, and futures, and each work gestures towards a queer history that we, as Queer Asian Americans, can excavate, (re)create, and (re)produce in our pasts, presents, and futures. For example, Greyson Hong's Costco photos, Việt Lê's productions of club scenes/ online performances, and Tina Takemoto's unconventional short film all tell of an alternative past to inform a queer alternative future. As we think of these experiences at the intersections with undocumented status, foreignness, and Islamophobia, their highly experimental and queer aesthetic in storytelling suggests further radical potential.

 

It is in this dangerous political climate that the artists in Queer Horizons insist on claiming liminal and hybrid spaces and lives, queer collectivity, and intersectional solidarity. Embracing failure, misbehavior, non-normativity, and defiant joyfulness thus becomes a radical form of resistance. This is the kind of utopian horizon that we call forward. In the spirit of artist Jeffrey Augustine Songco’s video, “Let’s Dance America!”

 

Queer Horizons appears in conjunction with the publication of Laura Kina and Jan Christian Bernabe’s book, Queering Contemporary Asian American Art (University of Washington Press, 2017). http://www.queeringcontemporaryasianamericanart.com/

 

Curated by Jan Christian Bernabe and Laura Kina

 

Curatorial Assistant: Mads Le

 

Contributors: Anida Yoeu Ali, Sita Kuratomi Bhaumik, Kim Anno, Wafaa Bilal, Greyson Hong, Kiam Marcelo Junio, Việt Lê, Maya Mackrandilal, Zavé Martohardjono, Jeffrey Augustine Songco, Tina Takemoto, and Saya Woolfalk.

 

Contributors’ works are published in staggered waves from late-June to late-July 2017, after which the whole exhibition are archived permanently on CA+T’s website.

 

Special thanks to the Andy Warhol Foundation and the California Institute of Contemporary Arts for fiscal support.

 

Summer 2017

Let's Dance America! (excerpt)

Jeffrey Augustine Songco

2016 Digital video Duration: 9 min. Courtesy of the artist

contributor

X

Jeffrey Augustine Songco

b. 1983
image description
  • See All Works
  • visit website

Jeffrey Augustine Songco is a multi-media artist. Born and raised in New Jersey, USA, to immigrant Filipino parents, his artistic identity developed at a young age with training in classical ballet, voice, and musical theater. Today, he uses these disciplines in the performing arts to produce stories as works of visual art. He holds a B.F.A. from Carnegie Mellon University and an M.F.A. from San Francisco Art Institute. He has exhibited throughout the United States, including the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco and the Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts in Grand Rapids. His writings have appeared in Art21 Blog, Bad at Sports, The Huffington Post, and Hyperallergic. He would like to be the US representative to the 2023 Venice Biennale. He currently lives and works in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

My obsessive consumption of superficial goods translates into the production of peculiar appropriation. There’s a lot of stuff out there to play with — things (as objects) and ideas (as language) are my materials. I'm interested in physical behavior, emotional narratives, and performed identities. I believe my artwork produces an infectious feeling of anxiety that can only be alleviated by a) the acceptance of the fluidity of meaning, 2) the impossibility of fully comprehending the absurd, and d) the inability to control your own laughter.

As the commissioned artist for the Center for Art and Thought’s exhibition Queer Sites and Sounds, I created a limited edition digital print titled Confessional. This work is the third iteration in a series of photographic prints depicting my “bag head character” juxtaposed with text from a grand narrative.

In 2012, I wrote my first screenplay titled The Host. The title refers to the protagonist – a white, affluent, suburban mom who is the beloved host on a popular home-shopping television network. The title also refers to the bread that is transformed into the body of Christ and eaten during Catholic mass. Throughout the film, the woman is negotiating her identity as a devout Catholic woman and as a mom to her recently outed college-aged son. In front of a million television viewers, she goes through her own transformation, performing a role that caters to a culturally conservative America, while knowing full well that her gay son is quietly shifting her away from those values. When I wrote the screenplay, I was just a writer with a dream, but I was also an artist with a camera. I created the triptych Hosanna as a way to visually manifest the text of The Host. In Hosanna, quotations from The Host flank the solitary white figure that is performing the role of the host. “Hosanna” is a biblical word that is shouted to express joy and adoration – an old-timer word for “OMG” or a phrase a woman might say when she sees sparkling jewelry.

By dressing in all white and placing a bag on my head, I enact a queer performance of the protagonist – a beautiful and empowered heterosexual white woman with personal anxiety that looms around her as she fulfills her own performance of self. This same concept can be used with the next iteration in the series, the diptych God Bless (Miss) America. I didn’t write a screenplay, but I’ve always been transfixed by pageantry – count me in as part of the demographic obsessed with TLC’s Toddlers and Tiaras who can also tell the difference between the Miss America and Miss USA pageants. The narrative of beauty pageants is so common in American popular culture that it has become a cliché, so I chose to use a clichéd question as the text within the artwork. In front of millions of television viewers, a pageant contestant must answer a seemingly bleak question with something that caters to the pageant judges and, ultimately, the identity of the nation.

I’m currently in the process of writing a screenplay titled The Cast, a dramatic film that focuses on a cast member of a reality television show about five affluent white married women living in San Francisco. Queer Sites and Sounds is the perfect site to visually translate the text of The Cast like I had done with The Host. My new artwork is titled Confessional, which refers to the idea of the Catholic Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation. Sharing and confessing sins to a priest in a small room allows the sinner to be absolved from mortal sins and avoid Hell. Decades ago, the word “confessional” was introduced to reality television when subjects of the show were taken aside from the main activity into a small room, and asked to share and confess how they felt about the events that just occurred. Subjects broke the fourth wall and spoke directly to the camera to share all their feelings and provide a proper narrative to the plot. The confessional has aesthetically evolved into what it is today, with the confessional interview being highly stylized and elaborately produced. Bravo Television’s The Real Housewives series provides fantastic examples of stylized confessionals, with characters confessing in front of luxurious backgrounds.

I’ve always had an interest in – some would say obsession with – white people. While I shine the spotlight on an American ideal, I don’t deny the multiple references to a darker side of white America: Christian extremism, political nationalism, military torture, and white supremacy. In Confessional, I chose to display a quotation that revealed a dramatic side of the reality show – adultery. This kind of saturated American identity is the root of my bag head character, which ultimately plays the role of an anonymous white person subject to the projections of any given story.

location

X
  • Born: New Jersey, USA
  • Based: Grand Rapids, MI

comments

X

Let's Dance America! (screenshot)

Jeffrey Augustine Songco

2016 Screen capture of video performance Courtesy of the artist

contributor

X

Jeffrey Augustine Songco

b. 1983
image description
  • See All Works
  • visit website

Jeffrey Augustine Songco is a multi-media artist. Born and raised in New Jersey, USA, to immigrant Filipino parents, his artistic identity developed at a young age with training in classical ballet, voice, and musical theater. Today, he uses these disciplines in the performing arts to produce stories as works of visual art. He holds a B.F.A. from Carnegie Mellon University and an M.F.A. from San Francisco Art Institute. He has exhibited throughout the United States, including the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco and the Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts in Grand Rapids. His writings have appeared in Art21 Blog, Bad at Sports, The Huffington Post, and Hyperallergic. He would like to be the US representative to the 2023 Venice Biennale. He currently lives and works in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

My obsessive consumption of superficial goods translates into the production of peculiar appropriation. There’s a lot of stuff out there to play with — things (as objects) and ideas (as language) are my materials. I'm interested in physical behavior, emotional narratives, and performed identities. I believe my artwork produces an infectious feeling of anxiety that can only be alleviated by a) the acceptance of the fluidity of meaning, 2) the impossibility of fully comprehending the absurd, and d) the inability to control your own laughter.

As the commissioned artist for the Center for Art and Thought’s exhibition Queer Sites and Sounds, I created a limited edition digital print titled Confessional. This work is the third iteration in a series of photographic prints depicting my “bag head character” juxtaposed with text from a grand narrative.

In 2012, I wrote my first screenplay titled The Host. The title refers to the protagonist – a white, affluent, suburban mom who is the beloved host on a popular home-shopping television network. The title also refers to the bread that is transformed into the body of Christ and eaten during Catholic mass. Throughout the film, the woman is negotiating her identity as a devout Catholic woman and as a mom to her recently outed college-aged son. In front of a million television viewers, she goes through her own transformation, performing a role that caters to a culturally conservative America, while knowing full well that her gay son is quietly shifting her away from those values. When I wrote the screenplay, I was just a writer with a dream, but I was also an artist with a camera. I created the triptych Hosanna as a way to visually manifest the text of The Host. In Hosanna, quotations from The Host flank the solitary white figure that is performing the role of the host. “Hosanna” is a biblical word that is shouted to express joy and adoration – an old-timer word for “OMG” or a phrase a woman might say when she sees sparkling jewelry.

By dressing in all white and placing a bag on my head, I enact a queer performance of the protagonist – a beautiful and empowered heterosexual white woman with personal anxiety that looms around her as she fulfills her own performance of self. This same concept can be used with the next iteration in the series, the diptych God Bless (Miss) America. I didn’t write a screenplay, but I’ve always been transfixed by pageantry – count me in as part of the demographic obsessed with TLC’s Toddlers and Tiaras who can also tell the difference between the Miss America and Miss USA pageants. The narrative of beauty pageants is so common in American popular culture that it has become a cliché, so I chose to use a clichéd question as the text within the artwork. In front of millions of television viewers, a pageant contestant must answer a seemingly bleak question with something that caters to the pageant judges and, ultimately, the identity of the nation.

I’m currently in the process of writing a screenplay titled The Cast, a dramatic film that focuses on a cast member of a reality television show about five affluent white married women living in San Francisco. Queer Sites and Sounds is the perfect site to visually translate the text of The Cast like I had done with The Host. My new artwork is titled Confessional, which refers to the idea of the Catholic Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation. Sharing and confessing sins to a priest in a small room allows the sinner to be absolved from mortal sins and avoid Hell. Decades ago, the word “confessional” was introduced to reality television when subjects of the show were taken aside from the main activity into a small room, and asked to share and confess how they felt about the events that just occurred. Subjects broke the fourth wall and spoke directly to the camera to share all their feelings and provide a proper narrative to the plot. The confessional has aesthetically evolved into what it is today, with the confessional interview being highly stylized and elaborately produced. Bravo Television’s The Real Housewives series provides fantastic examples of stylized confessionals, with characters confessing in front of luxurious backgrounds.

I’ve always had an interest in – some would say obsession with – white people. While I shine the spotlight on an American ideal, I don’t deny the multiple references to a darker side of white America: Christian extremism, political nationalism, military torture, and white supremacy. In Confessional, I chose to display a quotation that revealed a dramatic side of the reality show – adultery. This kind of saturated American identity is the root of my bag head character, which ultimately plays the role of an anonymous white person subject to the projections of any given story.

location

X
  • Born: New Jersey, USA
  • Based: Grand Rapids, MI

comments

X

heARTbreak! (teaser)

Việt Lê

2017 HD video, color, sound, projection, dimensions vary Duration: 1 min. 21 sec. Courtesy of the artist

contributor

X

Việt Lê

b. 1976

Việt Lê is an artist, writer, and curator. Lê is an assistant professor in Visual Studies at the California College of the Arts (San Francisco|Oakland). He has been published in positions: asia critique; Crab Orchard Review; American Quarterly; Amerasia Journal; Art Journal; and the anthologies Writing from the Perfume River (2010), Strange Cargo (2010), The Spaces Between Us (2010), Modern and Contemporary Southeast Asian Art (2012), among others.

Recent solo exhibitions include lovebang! (Kellogg University Art Gallery, Los Angeles, 2016), vestige (H Gallery Bangkok, 2015), and tan nÁRT cõi lòng | heARTbreak! (Nhà Sàn Collective, Hà Nội). Lê has presented his work at The Banff Centre, Alberta, Canada; University of California-Los Angeles Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, USA; DoBaeBacSa Gallery, Seoul, Korea; Japan Foundation, Việt Nam; 1a Space, Hong Kong; Bangkok Art & Cultural Center (BACC), Thailand; Civitella Ranieri, Italy; Shanghai Biennale, China; Rio Gay Film Festival, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; among other venues.

Lê curated Miss Saigon with the Wind (Highways, Santa Monica, 2005) and Charlie Don’t Surf! (Centre A, Vancouver, BC, 2005). He co-curated humor us (with Leta Ming and Yong Soon Min; Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, LA, CA, 2008), transPOP: Korea Việt Nam Remix (with Yong Soon Min; Seoul, Sài Gòn, Irvine, San Francisco, 2008-09), the 2012 Taipei Kuandu Biennale and Love in the Time of War (University of California, Santa Barbara and SF Camerawork). He co-organized the 2015 Artistic Interventions conference (Ph.D. workshops and symposium) in Hong Kong. Lê's projects have been featured in Newsweek Asia, The Korea Herald, The Toronto Star, Huffington Post, China Daily, Orange County Register, Bangkok Post, and The Cambodia Daily.

Lê received his M.F.A. from the University of California, Irvine, where he has also taught Studio Art and Visual Culture courses. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Southern California (Department of American Studies & Ethnicity). His writing has been translated into Chinese, German, Khmer, and Vietnamese.

The heARTbreak! 2016 sexperimental video (the teaser featured here) is the outgrowth of Việt Lê’s 2014 solo exhibition at H Project Space, Bangkok, comprised of three related interventions based on the 125 year-old building’s former life as a colonial-era Christian orphanage. Queerying time and space, the inter-related projects/ interventions reference the former orphange site, recent protests, as well as Southeast Asian refugee camps in Thailand (2015 was the 40th anniversary of the military engagements in Southeast Asia).

In a durational performance (24-29 December, 2014), the artist “occupied” H Project Space, conducted research, as well as embodied the historic figure of a lovelorn orphan who once lived in the building. During the meditative performance, Lê strung together beads—religious and otherwise—to form (with the assistance of community volunteers) another “curtain” to be hung up inside the space. Dealing with longing and loss, desire and despair, the works reference Felix Gonzales Torres’ mournful installations of curtains (Untitled [Blue Curtains], 1989/9) and beads (Untitled [Golden], 1995) as well as Lawrence Chua’s “sinsational” novel Gold by the Inch.

The artist invited the public to donate beads as well as to string together these beads with him. Using the keywords of refuge, refuse and refusal, the project also invites the public to come interact with the artist and create altars for loved ones or bring simple offerings—objects, drawings, gestures. Set to coincide with the Christmas holiday season, Lê examines the history of Christianity (among other spiritual practices) in Thailand, including H Gallery’s history as a former orphanage and the untimely death of the orphan.

Lastly, within the space, Lê aims to stage the second installment of his LOVE BANG! (a “faux phở-real”) music video trilogy. heART/break! is a sexperimental art music video for an original multi-lingual “hip pop” song (Vietnamese, Thai, Khmer and English). Featuring time-traveling, star-crossed figures (orphans, refugees), the video interweaves the past and the present. The new song pays tongue-in-cheek homage to Thai and Vietnamese tunes as well as Western pop songs, which are ever-present on the streets of Southeast Asia.

These strings of associations (pun intended) are a metaphorical means to look at the layered, traumatized topographies of Southeast Asian identities. The artist explores the divides—and connections—between spirituality and sexuality, the physical and the metaphysical.

location

X
  • Born: Sài Gòn
  • Based:

comments

X

2 of heARTs (scissor sisters)

Việt Lê

2016 C-print Dimensions variable Courtesy of the artist

contributor

X

Việt Lê

b. 1976

Việt Lê is an artist, writer, and curator. Lê is an assistant professor in Visual Studies at the California College of the Arts (San Francisco|Oakland). He has been published in positions: asia critique; Crab Orchard Review; American Quarterly; Amerasia Journal; Art Journal; and the anthologies Writing from the Perfume River (2010), Strange Cargo (2010), The Spaces Between Us (2010), Modern and Contemporary Southeast Asian Art (2012), among others.

Recent solo exhibitions include lovebang! (Kellogg University Art Gallery, Los Angeles, 2016), vestige (H Gallery Bangkok, 2015), and tan nÁRT cõi lòng | heARTbreak! (Nhà Sàn Collective, Hà Nội). Lê has presented his work at The Banff Centre, Alberta, Canada; University of California-Los Angeles Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, USA; DoBaeBacSa Gallery, Seoul, Korea; Japan Foundation, Việt Nam; 1a Space, Hong Kong; Bangkok Art & Cultural Center (BACC), Thailand; Civitella Ranieri, Italy; Shanghai Biennale, China; Rio Gay Film Festival, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; among other venues.

Lê curated Miss Saigon with the Wind (Highways, Santa Monica, 2005) and Charlie Don’t Surf! (Centre A, Vancouver, BC, 2005). He co-curated humor us (with Leta Ming and Yong Soon Min; Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, LA, CA, 2008), transPOP: Korea Việt Nam Remix (with Yong Soon Min; Seoul, Sài Gòn, Irvine, San Francisco, 2008-09), the 2012 Taipei Kuandu Biennale and Love in the Time of War (University of California, Santa Barbara and SF Camerawork). He co-organized the 2015 Artistic Interventions conference (Ph.D. workshops and symposium) in Hong Kong. Lê's projects have been featured in Newsweek Asia, The Korea Herald, The Toronto Star, Huffington Post, China Daily, Orange County Register, Bangkok Post, and The Cambodia Daily.

Lê received his M.F.A. from the University of California, Irvine, where he has also taught Studio Art and Visual Culture courses. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Southern California (Department of American Studies & Ethnicity). His writing has been translated into Chinese, German, Khmer, and Vietnamese.

The heARTbreak! 2016 sexperimental video (the teaser featured here) is the outgrowth of Việt Lê’s 2014 solo exhibition at H Project Space, Bangkok, comprised of three related interventions based on the 125 year-old building’s former life as a colonial-era Christian orphanage. Queerying time and space, the inter-related projects/ interventions reference the former orphange site, recent protests, as well as Southeast Asian refugee camps in Thailand (2015 was the 40th anniversary of the military engagements in Southeast Asia).

In a durational performance (24-29 December, 2014), the artist “occupied” H Project Space, conducted research, as well as embodied the historic figure of a lovelorn orphan who once lived in the building. During the meditative performance, Lê strung together beads—religious and otherwise—to form (with the assistance of community volunteers) another “curtain” to be hung up inside the space. Dealing with longing and loss, desire and despair, the works reference Felix Gonzales Torres’ mournful installations of curtains (Untitled [Blue Curtains], 1989/9) and beads (Untitled [Golden], 1995) as well as Lawrence Chua’s “sinsational” novel Gold by the Inch.

The artist invited the public to donate beads as well as to string together these beads with him. Using the keywords of refuge, refuse and refusal, the project also invites the public to come interact with the artist and create altars for loved ones or bring simple offerings—objects, drawings, gestures. Set to coincide with the Christmas holiday season, Lê examines the history of Christianity (among other spiritual practices) in Thailand, including H Gallery’s history as a former orphanage and the untimely death of the orphan.

Lastly, within the space, Lê aims to stage the second installment of his LOVE BANG! (a “faux phở-real”) music video trilogy. heART/break! is a sexperimental art music video for an original multi-lingual “hip pop” song (Vietnamese, Thai, Khmer and English). Featuring time-traveling, star-crossed figures (orphans, refugees), the video interweaves the past and the present. The new song pays tongue-in-cheek homage to Thai and Vietnamese tunes as well as Western pop songs, which are ever-present on the streets of Southeast Asia.

These strings of associations (pun intended) are a metaphorical means to look at the layered, traumatized topographies of Southeast Asian identities. The artist explores the divides—and connections—between spirituality and sexuality, the physical and the metaphysical.

location

X
  • Born: Sài Gòn
  • Based:

comments

X

heARTbreak! (installation view)

Việt Lê

2016 Mixed media, HD video, color sound Duration: 5 min. 25 sec. Courtesy of the artist

contributor

X

Việt Lê

b. 1976

Việt Lê is an artist, writer, and curator. Lê is an assistant professor in Visual Studies at the California College of the Arts (San Francisco|Oakland). He has been published in positions: asia critique; Crab Orchard Review; American Quarterly; Amerasia Journal; Art Journal; and the anthologies Writing from the Perfume River (2010), Strange Cargo (2010), The Spaces Between Us (2010), Modern and Contemporary Southeast Asian Art (2012), among others.

Recent solo exhibitions include lovebang! (Kellogg University Art Gallery, Los Angeles, 2016), vestige (H Gallery Bangkok, 2015), and tan nÁRT cõi lòng | heARTbreak! (Nhà Sàn Collective, Hà Nội). Lê has presented his work at The Banff Centre, Alberta, Canada; University of California-Los Angeles Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, USA; DoBaeBacSa Gallery, Seoul, Korea; Japan Foundation, Việt Nam; 1a Space, Hong Kong; Bangkok Art & Cultural Center (BACC), Thailand; Civitella Ranieri, Italy; Shanghai Biennale, China; Rio Gay Film Festival, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; among other venues.

Lê curated Miss Saigon with the Wind (Highways, Santa Monica, 2005) and Charlie Don’t Surf! (Centre A, Vancouver, BC, 2005). He co-curated humor us (with Leta Ming and Yong Soon Min; Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, LA, CA, 2008), transPOP: Korea Việt Nam Remix (with Yong Soon Min; Seoul, Sài Gòn, Irvine, San Francisco, 2008-09), the 2012 Taipei Kuandu Biennale and Love in the Time of War (University of California, Santa Barbara and SF Camerawork). He co-organized the 2015 Artistic Interventions conference (Ph.D. workshops and symposium) in Hong Kong. Lê's projects have been featured in Newsweek Asia, The Korea Herald, The Toronto Star, Huffington Post, China Daily, Orange County Register, Bangkok Post, and The Cambodia Daily.

Lê received his M.F.A. from the University of California, Irvine, where he has also taught Studio Art and Visual Culture courses. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Southern California (Department of American Studies & Ethnicity). His writing has been translated into Chinese, German, Khmer, and Vietnamese.

The heARTbreak! 2016 sexperimental video (the teaser featured here) is the outgrowth of Việt Lê’s 2014 solo exhibition at H Project Space, Bangkok, comprised of three related interventions based on the 125 year-old building’s former life as a colonial-era Christian orphanage. Queerying time and space, the inter-related projects/ interventions reference the former orphange site, recent protests, as well as Southeast Asian refugee camps in Thailand (2015 was the 40th anniversary of the military engagements in Southeast Asia).

In a durational performance (24-29 December, 2014), the artist “occupied” H Project Space, conducted research, as well as embodied the historic figure of a lovelorn orphan who once lived in the building. During the meditative performance, Lê strung together beads—religious and otherwise—to form (with the assistance of community volunteers) another “curtain” to be hung up inside the space. Dealing with longing and loss, desire and despair, the works reference Felix Gonzales Torres’ mournful installations of curtains (Untitled [Blue Curtains], 1989/9) and beads (Untitled [Golden], 1995) as well as Lawrence Chua’s “sinsational” novel Gold by the Inch.

The artist invited the public to donate beads as well as to string together these beads with him. Using the keywords of refuge, refuse and refusal, the project also invites the public to come interact with the artist and create altars for loved ones or bring simple offerings—objects, drawings, gestures. Set to coincide with the Christmas holiday season, Lê examines the history of Christianity (among other spiritual practices) in Thailand, including H Gallery’s history as a former orphanage and the untimely death of the orphan.

Lastly, within the space, Lê aims to stage the second installment of his LOVE BANG! (a “faux phở-real”) music video trilogy. heART/break! is a sexperimental art music video for an original multi-lingual “hip pop” song (Vietnamese, Thai, Khmer and English). Featuring time-traveling, star-crossed figures (orphans, refugees), the video interweaves the past and the present. The new song pays tongue-in-cheek homage to Thai and Vietnamese tunes as well as Western pop songs, which are ever-present on the streets of Southeast Asia.

These strings of associations (pun intended) are a metaphorical means to look at the layered, traumatized topographies of Southeast Asian identities. The artist explores the divides—and connections—between spirituality and sexuality, the physical and the metaphysical.

location

X
  • Born: Sài Gòn
  • Based:

comments

X

lonely heARTsclub band(aid)

Việt Lê

2017 Vinyl Banner (edition of 3) 90” X 60” Courtesy of the artist

contributor

X

Việt Lê

b. 1976

Việt Lê is an artist, writer, and curator. Lê is an assistant professor in Visual Studies at the California College of the Arts (San Francisco|Oakland). He has been published in positions: asia critique; Crab Orchard Review; American Quarterly; Amerasia Journal; Art Journal; and the anthologies Writing from the Perfume River (2010), Strange Cargo (2010), The Spaces Between Us (2010), Modern and Contemporary Southeast Asian Art (2012), among others.

Recent solo exhibitions include lovebang! (Kellogg University Art Gallery, Los Angeles, 2016), vestige (H Gallery Bangkok, 2015), and tan nÁRT cõi lòng | heARTbreak! (Nhà Sàn Collective, Hà Nội). Lê has presented his work at The Banff Centre, Alberta, Canada; University of California-Los Angeles Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, USA; DoBaeBacSa Gallery, Seoul, Korea; Japan Foundation, Việt Nam; 1a Space, Hong Kong; Bangkok Art & Cultural Center (BACC), Thailand; Civitella Ranieri, Italy; Shanghai Biennale, China; Rio Gay Film Festival, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; among other venues.

Lê curated Miss Saigon with the Wind (Highways, Santa Monica, 2005) and Charlie Don’t Surf! (Centre A, Vancouver, BC, 2005). He co-curated humor us (with Leta Ming and Yong Soon Min; Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, LA, CA, 2008), transPOP: Korea Việt Nam Remix (with Yong Soon Min; Seoul, Sài Gòn, Irvine, San Francisco, 2008-09), the 2012 Taipei Kuandu Biennale and Love in the Time of War (University of California, Santa Barbara and SF Camerawork). He co-organized the 2015 Artistic Interventions conference (Ph.D. workshops and symposium) in Hong Kong. Lê's projects have been featured in Newsweek Asia, The Korea Herald, The Toronto Star, Huffington Post, China Daily, Orange County Register, Bangkok Post, and The Cambodia Daily.

Lê received his M.F.A. from the University of California, Irvine, where he has also taught Studio Art and Visual Culture courses. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Southern California (Department of American Studies & Ethnicity). His writing has been translated into Chinese, German, Khmer, and Vietnamese.

The heARTbreak! 2016 sexperimental video (the teaser featured here) is the outgrowth of Việt Lê’s 2014 solo exhibition at H Project Space, Bangkok, comprised of three related interventions based on the 125 year-old building’s former life as a colonial-era Christian orphanage. Queerying time and space, the inter-related projects/ interventions reference the former orphange site, recent protests, as well as Southeast Asian refugee camps in Thailand (2015 was the 40th anniversary of the military engagements in Southeast Asia).

In a durational performance (24-29 December, 2014), the artist “occupied” H Project Space, conducted research, as well as embodied the historic figure of a lovelorn orphan who once lived in the building. During the meditative performance, Lê strung together beads—religious and otherwise—to form (with the assistance of community volunteers) another “curtain” to be hung up inside the space. Dealing with longing and loss, desire and despair, the works reference Felix Gonzales Torres’ mournful installations of curtains (Untitled [Blue Curtains], 1989/9) and beads (Untitled [Golden], 1995) as well as Lawrence Chua’s “sinsational” novel Gold by the Inch.

The artist invited the public to donate beads as well as to string together these beads with him. Using the keywords of refuge, refuse and refusal, the project also invites the public to come interact with the artist and create altars for loved ones or bring simple offerings—objects, drawings, gestures. Set to coincide with the Christmas holiday season, Lê examines the history of Christianity (among other spiritual practices) in Thailand, including H Gallery’s history as a former orphanage and the untimely death of the orphan.

Lastly, within the space, Lê aims to stage the second installment of his LOVE BANG! (a “faux phở-real”) music video trilogy. heART/break! is a sexperimental art music video for an original multi-lingual “hip pop” song (Vietnamese, Thai, Khmer and English). Featuring time-traveling, star-crossed figures (orphans, refugees), the video interweaves the past and the present. The new song pays tongue-in-cheek homage to Thai and Vietnamese tunes as well as Western pop songs, which are ever-present on the streets of Southeast Asia.

These strings of associations (pun intended) are a metaphorical means to look at the layered, traumatized topographies of Southeast Asian identities. The artist explores the divides—and connections—between spirituality and sexuality, the physical and the metaphysical.

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  • Born: Sài Gòn
  • Based:

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The Red Chador: Threshold

Anida Yoeu Ali

2016 Archival Ink Jet Print Courtesy of Studio Revolt Photographer: Les Talusan

contributor

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Anida Yoeu Ali

b. 1974

Anida Yoeu Ali is an artist, educator and global agitator. Ali’s practice spans performance, installation, videos, images, public encounters, and political agitation. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach to art-making, her installation and performance works investigate the artistic, spiritual, and political collisions of a hybrid transnational identity. In 2015, Ali won the top prize of the Sovereign Art Prize, Hong Kong. Her work is exhibited internationally, most notably with the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, 5th Fukuoka Asian Art Triennial, Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art, Palais de Tokyo, and the Asia Pacific Triennial 8. She is a collaborative partner with Studio Revolt, a trans-nomadic artist-run media lab whose controversial works on deportation have caused White House interns to be fired. Ali earned her B.F.A. from University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign) and an M.F.A. from School of the Art Institute Chicago. She is currently the Artist-in-Residence at the University of Washington, Bothell where she teaches art, performance, and global studies courses. Ali resides in Tacoma and spends much of her time working between the Asia-Pacific region and the US!

My artistic vision requires an element of risk and belief that performance art, humor, and religion can fuse conceptually and aesthetically. Through an interdisciplinary approach, my work maps new political and spiritual landscapes. Often meters and meters of textile act as skin, as a way for the surface of my body to extend into public spaces, and as a metaphorical device for stories to spread across an expanse.

In The Red Chador: Threshold, performed in Washington, DC, I pose the question: Can we accept a Muslim woman as an American patriot? The Red Chador: Threshold was a commissioned performance for Crosslines Culture Lab and hosted by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. Covered from head to toe in a red sequined chador, I sat, stood, and walked silently around for eight hours over three days during Memorial weekend. For me, The Red Chador embodies how the mere existence of a Muslim woman can be misinterpreted in an era of heightened Islamophobia. For two days, I was installed in the building’s rotunda, where the Statue of America stood over a century ago at the Smithsonian Arts and Industries Building. Ninety-nine American flags as well as ninety-nine white flags printed with Salaam—Arabic for peace—surrounded me, challenging the idea that my Muslim and American identities are at odds. On Memorial Day, I took The Red Chador out to the streets of [Washington,] DC, walking amongst the everyday people at famous historical sites and memorials. Concurrent to my appearance, the Rolling Thunder annual motorcycle rally of veterans also rolled into town. Since 2015, The Red Chador has appeared in Paris, Hartford, CT; San Francisco, CA; Seattle, WA; Washington, DC; and Hong Kong.

location

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  • Born: Cambodia
  • Based: Tacoma, WA, USA
  • Also Based in: Chicago, IL, USA

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The Red Chador: Threshold

Anida Yoeu Ali

2016 Archival Ink Jet Print Courtesy of Studio Revolt Photographer: Les Talusan

contributor

X

Anida Yoeu Ali

b. 1974

Anida Yoeu Ali is an artist, educator and global agitator. Ali’s practice spans performance, installation, videos, images, public encounters, and political agitation. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach to art-making, her installation and performance works investigate the artistic, spiritual, and political collisions of a hybrid transnational identity. In 2015, Ali won the top prize of the Sovereign Art Prize, Hong Kong. Her work is exhibited internationally, most notably with the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, 5th Fukuoka Asian Art Triennial, Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art, Palais de Tokyo, and the Asia Pacific Triennial 8. She is a collaborative partner with Studio Revolt, a trans-nomadic artist-run media lab whose controversial works on deportation have caused White House interns to be fired. Ali earned her B.F.A. from University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign) and an M.F.A. from School of the Art Institute Chicago. She is currently the Artist-in-Residence at the University of Washington, Bothell where she teaches art, performance, and global studies courses. Ali resides in Tacoma and spends much of her time working between the Asia-Pacific region and the US!

My artistic vision requires an element of risk and belief that performance art, humor, and religion can fuse conceptually and aesthetically. Through an interdisciplinary approach, my work maps new political and spiritual landscapes. Often meters and meters of textile act as skin, as a way for the surface of my body to extend into public spaces, and as a metaphorical device for stories to spread across an expanse.

In The Red Chador: Threshold, performed in Washington, DC, I pose the question: Can we accept a Muslim woman as an American patriot? The Red Chador: Threshold was a commissioned performance for Crosslines Culture Lab and hosted by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. Covered from head to toe in a red sequined chador, I sat, stood, and walked silently around for eight hours over three days during Memorial weekend. For me, The Red Chador embodies how the mere existence of a Muslim woman can be misinterpreted in an era of heightened Islamophobia. For two days, I was installed in the building’s rotunda, where the Statue of America stood over a century ago at the Smithsonian Arts and Industries Building. Ninety-nine American flags as well as ninety-nine white flags printed with Salaam—Arabic for peace—surrounded me, challenging the idea that my Muslim and American identities are at odds. On Memorial Day, I took The Red Chador out to the streets of [Washington,] DC, walking amongst the everyday people at famous historical sites and memorials. Concurrent to my appearance, the Rolling Thunder annual motorcycle rally of veterans also rolled into town. Since 2015, The Red Chador has appeared in Paris, Hartford, CT; San Francisco, CA; Seattle, WA; Washington, DC; and Hong Kong.

location

X
  • Born: Cambodia
  • Based: Tacoma, WA, USA
  • Also Based in: Chicago, IL, USA

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X

The Red Chador: Threshold / Triptych

Anida Yoeu Ali

2016 Wall Mural 9' x 11' Courtesy of Studio Revolt Photographer: Les Talusan

contributor

X

Anida Yoeu Ali

b. 1974

Anida Yoeu Ali is an artist, educator and global agitator. Ali’s practice spans performance, installation, videos, images, public encounters, and political agitation. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach to art-making, her installation and performance works investigate the artistic, spiritual, and political collisions of a hybrid transnational identity. In 2015, Ali won the top prize of the Sovereign Art Prize, Hong Kong. Her work is exhibited internationally, most notably with the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, 5th Fukuoka Asian Art Triennial, Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art, Palais de Tokyo, and the Asia Pacific Triennial 8. She is a collaborative partner with Studio Revolt, a trans-nomadic artist-run media lab whose controversial works on deportation have caused White House interns to be fired. Ali earned her B.F.A. from University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign) and an M.F.A. from School of the Art Institute Chicago. She is currently the Artist-in-Residence at the University of Washington, Bothell where she teaches art, performance, and global studies courses. Ali resides in Tacoma and spends much of her time working between the Asia-Pacific region and the US!

My artistic vision requires an element of risk and belief that performance art, humor, and religion can fuse conceptually and aesthetically. Through an interdisciplinary approach, my work maps new political and spiritual landscapes. Often meters and meters of textile act as skin, as a way for the surface of my body to extend into public spaces, and as a metaphorical device for stories to spread across an expanse.

In The Red Chador: Threshold, performed in Washington, DC, I pose the question: Can we accept a Muslim woman as an American patriot? The Red Chador: Threshold was a commissioned performance for Crosslines Culture Lab and hosted by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. Covered from head to toe in a red sequined chador, I sat, stood, and walked silently around for eight hours over three days during Memorial weekend. For me, The Red Chador embodies how the mere existence of a Muslim woman can be misinterpreted in an era of heightened Islamophobia. For two days, I was installed in the building’s rotunda, where the Statue of America stood over a century ago at the Smithsonian Arts and Industries Building. Ninety-nine American flags as well as ninety-nine white flags printed with Salaam—Arabic for peace—surrounded me, challenging the idea that my Muslim and American identities are at odds. On Memorial Day, I took The Red Chador out to the streets of [Washington,] DC, walking amongst the everyday people at famous historical sites and memorials. Concurrent to my appearance, the Rolling Thunder annual motorcycle rally of veterans also rolled into town. Since 2015, The Red Chador has appeared in Paris, Hartford, CT; San Francisco, CA; Seattle, WA; Washington, DC; and Hong Kong.

location

X
  • Born: Cambodia
  • Based: Tacoma, WA, USA
  • Also Based in: Chicago, IL, USA

comments

X

The Red Chador: Threshold

Anida Yoeu Ali

2016 Vinyl Window Mural 188.75” x 89” Courtesy of Studio Revolt Photographer: Masahiro Sugano

contributor

X

Anida Yoeu Ali

b. 1974

Anida Yoeu Ali is an artist, educator and global agitator. Ali’s practice spans performance, installation, videos, images, public encounters, and political agitation. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach to art-making, her installation and performance works investigate the artistic, spiritual, and political collisions of a hybrid transnational identity. In 2015, Ali won the top prize of the Sovereign Art Prize, Hong Kong. Her work is exhibited internationally, most notably with the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, 5th Fukuoka Asian Art Triennial, Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art, Palais de Tokyo, and the Asia Pacific Triennial 8. She is a collaborative partner with Studio Revolt, a trans-nomadic artist-run media lab whose controversial works on deportation have caused White House interns to be fired. Ali earned her B.F.A. from University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign) and an M.F.A. from School of the Art Institute Chicago. She is currently the Artist-in-Residence at the University of Washington, Bothell where she teaches art, performance, and global studies courses. Ali resides in Tacoma and spends much of her time working between the Asia-Pacific region and the US!

My artistic vision requires an element of risk and belief that performance art, humor, and religion can fuse conceptually and aesthetically. Through an interdisciplinary approach, my work maps new political and spiritual landscapes. Often meters and meters of textile act as skin, as a way for the surface of my body to extend into public spaces, and as a metaphorical device for stories to spread across an expanse.

In The Red Chador: Threshold, performed in Washington, DC, I pose the question: Can we accept a Muslim woman as an American patriot? The Red Chador: Threshold was a commissioned performance for Crosslines Culture Lab and hosted by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. Covered from head to toe in a red sequined chador, I sat, stood, and walked silently around for eight hours over three days during Memorial weekend. For me, The Red Chador embodies how the mere existence of a Muslim woman can be misinterpreted in an era of heightened Islamophobia. For two days, I was installed in the building’s rotunda, where the Statue of America stood over a century ago at the Smithsonian Arts and Industries Building. Ninety-nine American flags as well as ninety-nine white flags printed with Salaam—Arabic for peace—surrounded me, challenging the idea that my Muslim and American identities are at odds. On Memorial Day, I took The Red Chador out to the streets of [Washington,] DC, walking amongst the everyday people at famous historical sites and memorials. Concurrent to my appearance, the Rolling Thunder annual motorcycle rally of veterans also rolled into town. Since 2015, The Red Chador has appeared in Paris, Hartford, CT; San Francisco, CA; Seattle, WA; Washington, DC; and Hong Kong.

location

X
  • Born: Cambodia
  • Based: Tacoma, WA, USA
  • Also Based in: Chicago, IL, USA

comments

X