topic

Indigeneity

"We had to find some way not only of retaining, but rediscovering, our culture." -- Joel Jacinto, Kayamanan ng Lahi performing arts group

Father Alvin Cabacang, OSM

Critical Filipina and Filipino Studies Collective

2013 Photograph Variable dimensions Courtesy of Valerie Francisco Caption: Father Cabacang performing an indigenous blessing dance at the opening of a cultural event to raise funds and awareness about Typhoon Haiyan affected regions

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Critical Filipina and Filipino Studies Collective

As an activist-scholar group, the Critical Filipina and Filipino Studies Collective (CFFSC) seeks to organize educators and scholars to interrogate and challenge histories of Western imperialisms (Spanish and U.S. imperialisms), ongoing neocolonial relations in the Philippines, and their relationship to past and present Filipina/o migrations through our research and teaching both within the university and beyond it.

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Ta, Too Project 01

Kimberley Acebo Arteche

2014 Lightbox installation. 18 in. x 24 in. x 3 in. Courtesy of the artist.

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Kimberley Acebo Arteche

b. 1987
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Born in Silver Spring, Maryland, Kimberley was raised in the suburbs of the Metropolitan Washington, D.C. area. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Visual Arts and Photography from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. During college, she was heavily involved with the Filipino American Student Association at UMBC and served as National Director and District VI Chair for Filipino Intercollegiate Networking Dialogue (F.I.N.D.). She was also a Principal dancer and Director of Operations for the 501(c)3 non-profit organization, Culture Shock Washington, D.C. She has worked with several arts youth and community outreach programs, including Banner Neighborhoods, Sitar Arts Center, and So Others Might Eat ( S.O.M.E.). Kimberley also recently served as Executive Producer for the 2013 International Choreographer’s Showcase held in Washington, D.C.

Kimberley currently resides in Daly City, California and is pursuing her M.F.A. in Art at San Francisco State University. She is the recipient of the 2014 Sher-Right Scholarship and 2014 Jack and Gertrude Murphy Award, administered by The San Francisco Foundation. She will be showing in an exhibition of the Murphy and Cadogan awardees at the SOMArts Cultural Center in San Francisco, California, opening on September 3, 2014.

 

Photograph by Joseph Mintz. 

This series of self-portrait installations is in dialogue with Carlos Villa's "Tat2" pieces that appropriated Maori facial tattoo traditions to explore his identity as a Filipino American in the 1970s. Villa’s appropriation of Maori tattooing was a reflection on the inaccessibility to information of Filipino Art History and Indigenous Filipino traditions.

Considering how technology and the Internet has aided my search for self and placing myself within today’s ethnic and cultural landscape, I manipulate and construct images through digital processes that allow me to explore the complex burden in our relationships with images and identity.

Through research of Wang Od, the last Philippine headhunting tattoo artist, and traditional Kalinga tattooing traditions in women, I continue Villa’s exploration of identity, opening a critical discussion on how information and images have been embedded into our bodies, and how our image-informed identities are then performed in our everyday lives.

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  • Born: Silver Spring, MD, USA
  • Based: Daly City, CA, USA

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Ta, Too Project 03

Kimberley Acebo Arteche

2014 Lightbox installation. 18 in. x 24 in. x 3 in. Courtesy of the artist.

contributor

X

Kimberley Acebo Arteche

b. 1987
image description
  • See All Works
  • visit website

Born in Silver Spring, Maryland, Kimberley was raised in the suburbs of the Metropolitan Washington, D.C. area. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Visual Arts and Photography from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. During college, she was heavily involved with the Filipino American Student Association at UMBC and served as National Director and District VI Chair for Filipino Intercollegiate Networking Dialogue (F.I.N.D.). She was also a Principal dancer and Director of Operations for the 501(c)3 non-profit organization, Culture Shock Washington, D.C. She has worked with several arts youth and community outreach programs, including Banner Neighborhoods, Sitar Arts Center, and So Others Might Eat ( S.O.M.E.). Kimberley also recently served as Executive Producer for the 2013 International Choreographer’s Showcase held in Washington, D.C.

Kimberley currently resides in Daly City, California and is pursuing her M.F.A. in Art at San Francisco State University. She is the recipient of the 2014 Sher-Right Scholarship and 2014 Jack and Gertrude Murphy Award, administered by The San Francisco Foundation. She will be showing in an exhibition of the Murphy and Cadogan awardees at the SOMArts Cultural Center in San Francisco, California, opening on September 3, 2014.

 

Photograph by Joseph Mintz. 

This series of self-portrait installations is in dialogue with Carlos Villa's "Tat2" pieces that appropriated Maori facial tattoo traditions to explore his identity as a Filipino American in the 1970s. Villa’s appropriation of Maori tattooing was a reflection on the inaccessibility to information of Filipino Art History and Indigenous Filipino traditions.

Considering how technology and the Internet has aided my search for self and placing myself within today’s ethnic and cultural landscape, I manipulate and construct images through digital processes that allow me to explore the complex burden in our relationships with images and identity.

Through research of Wang Od, the last Philippine headhunting tattoo artist, and traditional Kalinga tattooing traditions in women, I continue Villa’s exploration of identity, opening a critical discussion on how information and images have been embedded into our bodies, and how our image-informed identities are then performed in our everyday lives.

location

X
  • Born: Silver Spring, MD, USA
  • Based: Daly City, CA, USA

comments

X

Ta, Too Project 04

Kimberley Acebo Arteche

2014 Lightbox installation. 18 in. x 24 in. x 3 in. Courtesy of the artist.

contributor

X

Kimberley Acebo Arteche

b. 1987
image description
  • See All Works
  • visit website

Born in Silver Spring, Maryland, Kimberley was raised in the suburbs of the Metropolitan Washington, D.C. area. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Visual Arts and Photography from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. During college, she was heavily involved with the Filipino American Student Association at UMBC and served as National Director and District VI Chair for Filipino Intercollegiate Networking Dialogue (F.I.N.D.). She was also a Principal dancer and Director of Operations for the 501(c)3 non-profit organization, Culture Shock Washington, D.C. She has worked with several arts youth and community outreach programs, including Banner Neighborhoods, Sitar Arts Center, and So Others Might Eat ( S.O.M.E.). Kimberley also recently served as Executive Producer for the 2013 International Choreographer’s Showcase held in Washington, D.C.

Kimberley currently resides in Daly City, California and is pursuing her M.F.A. in Art at San Francisco State University. She is the recipient of the 2014 Sher-Right Scholarship and 2014 Jack and Gertrude Murphy Award, administered by The San Francisco Foundation. She will be showing in an exhibition of the Murphy and Cadogan awardees at the SOMArts Cultural Center in San Francisco, California, opening on September 3, 2014.

 

Photograph by Joseph Mintz. 

This series of self-portrait installations is in dialogue with Carlos Villa's "Tat2" pieces that appropriated Maori facial tattoo traditions to explore his identity as a Filipino American in the 1970s. Villa’s appropriation of Maori tattooing was a reflection on the inaccessibility to information of Filipino Art History and Indigenous Filipino traditions.

Considering how technology and the Internet has aided my search for self and placing myself within today’s ethnic and cultural landscape, I manipulate and construct images through digital processes that allow me to explore the complex burden in our relationships with images and identity.

Through research of Wang Od, the last Philippine headhunting tattoo artist, and traditional Kalinga tattooing traditions in women, I continue Villa’s exploration of identity, opening a critical discussion on how information and images have been embedded into our bodies, and how our image-informed identities are then performed in our everyday lives.

location

X
  • Born: Silver Spring, MD, USA
  • Based: Daly City, CA, USA

comments

X