curated exhibition

RaceCraft

Slow. Sustainable. DIY. Green. Local. Anti-mainstream.
These are the ideals that drive the popularity of the contemporary craft movement. But what is rendered invisible in the celebration of craft as a means of social change?
 
Where and how does race intersect with craft practices and craft discourse?
 
The artists and writers in this exhibition foreground alternative practices and genealogies. They make visible the neoliberal underpinnings of the contemporary craft movement. They reveal how craft is marked by race, heteropatriarchy and colonization, and they challenge an environmental politics founded on sustaining whiteness.
 
In RaceCraft, being “crafty” is not just aptitude and a lifestyle choice. It is artful subterfuge in the face of racial constraints.
 
Co-curated by Marie Lo and Sarita Echavez See.
 
Contributors’ works are published in staggered waves from late October to mid-November 2015, and the whole exhibition is archived permanently here on CA+T’s website.
 
Contributors include Kimberly Alidio, Aram Han, Kiam Marcelo Junio, Bovey Lee, Kang Seung Lee, Marie Lo, Tim Manalo, Alfred Marasigan, Do Ho Suh, Stephanie Syjuco, Namita Wiggers, and Kristina Wong. 
 
Special thanks to Jan Christian Bernabe for curatorial guidance; Martina Dorff and Gian Dionisio for research and clerical assistance; and the California Institute of Contemporary Arts for fiscal support.
 
Fall 2015

"The Wong Street Journal" - the Sizzle Reel! Political Performance Art Comedy!

Kristina Wong

2014 - 2015 Video of solo performance Duration: 2m 26s Courtesy of Kristina Wong

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Kristina Wong

b. 1978
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Kristina Wong is a third generation Chinese American, born in San Francisco and living in Los Angeles. Her work encompasses original solo performances, comedy, personal essays, acting, short films and textile work. She was recently featured in the New York Times’ "Off Color" series that “highlight[ed] artists of color who use humor to make smart social statements about the sometimes subtle, sometimes obvious ways that race plays out in America today.” She has created five solo shows and one ensemble play that have toured throughout the United States and the United Kingdom. Her longest running touring show, Wong Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, looked at the high rates of depression and suicide among Asian American women and toured to over 40 venues since 2006. It’s now a broadcast quality film distributed by Cinema Libre Studios. Kristina’s been a commentator for American Public Media’s Marketplace, PBS, Jezebel, xoJane, Playgirl Magazine, Huffington Post, CNN and a guest on Comedy Central’s “The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore” and FXX’s “Totally Biased with W. Kamau Bell.” Her work has been awarded with grants from Creative Capital, The Map Fund, Center for Cultural Innovation, the Durfee Foundation, National Performance Network, five Artist-in-Residence grants from the Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs, and a residency from the MacDowell Colony. Kristina has twice given the commencement speech at the University of California, Los Angeles, her alma mater. She graduated with double degrees in English and World Arts and Cultures with a minor in Asian American Studies. She is also trained as an actor at the Steven Book Studios and improvisation at the Upright Citizens Brigade. Television credits include General Hospital, Nickelodeon’s “Nicky Ricky Dicky and Dawn,” and Myx TV’s “I’m Asian American and Want Reparations for Yellow Fever.” This Fall, she is a guest professor at California Institute for the Arts in the M.F.A. Creative Writing Program. Her mail order bride site is www.bigbadchinesemama.com.

I believe that as an artist, my job is not to “fix” the wrongs of the world with easy answers, but instead, to further complicate the question by making the invisible visible, and hopefully, creating some space for public discourse. I would describe my aesthetic at its best as subversive, humorous, and endearingly inappropriate. My non-traditional, multi-disciplinary approach logically mirrors my own multi-layered identity that has been influenced by innumerous cultures, religions, political thinking, technology and post-modern performance art. My nebulous identity continues to shift within the communities I live, evolve and interact with. I see my performance work as a humorous and ephemeral response to the invisible and visible boundaries that shape my world, rather than a hermetic declaration of my identity. I’m interested in guerilla performance as culture jamming– creating performances that subvert the use of space not intended for “performance.” I experiment with interactive, improvisational performance that blurs the roles of “artist” and “audience”— recasting unsuspecting bystanders as co-stars to my performance personas -– unearthing the masks, disguises and performances hidden in the most mundane of daily life. I adore “culture jammers.” Some of my favorites are the street interventions of Michael Moore, the “identity corrections” of the Yes Men, and the feminists who crashed television beauty pageants when I was growing up. Their performances are disguised within daily life to subvert, manipulate, and explode the status quo. I also appreciate the simplicity and elegance of interactive work like Yoko Ono’s. Much of my own guerilla theater work similarly offers social commentary and bypasses theaters and galleries—staged on the internet or alternative spaces. My theater work is informed by my site specific performance sensibilities. In my theater work, I challenge my relationship as a performer to my audience. I also confront the expectations of my genre and my subject matter within the work. My stage performance work differs from the Eurocentric theater traditions of 19th and 20th Century American Realism where actors apply “realistic” emotions to pre-written scripts. I see my “characters” as archetypal extensions of my own persona. I almost always break the fourth wall and let my audiences inform the direction of the show. My creation process is very organic. Some of my shows are living ritual exercises with the audience. I find that pre-scripting my work line-by-line at my computer and then rehearsing emotion into those lines is a very confining process. I prefer to generate lists of ideas and doodles, talk them out with trusted collaborators, improvise with a mix of media during rehearsals and then string up the best moments in a logical (or illogically logical) order for public performance. Some of my scripts actually look like a set list that a stand-up comic would use.

location

X
  • Born: San Francisco, CA, USA
  • Based: Los Angeles, CA, USA

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A Mend: A Collection of Scraps from Local Seamstresses and Tailors (Chicago)

Aram Han Sifuentes

2011 - 2013 Jean scraps and gold denim thread 14 ft. x 10 ft. x 4 ft. Courtesy of the artist Photo credit: Hyounsang Yoo

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X

Aram Han Sifuentes

b. 1986
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Aram Han Sifuentes is a social practice fiber artist and works closely with Chicago-based non-profit organizations, community centers, and public schools to facilitate workshops for immigrant communities. She has exhibited her work nationally and internationally. Her solo exhibitions include “A Mend” at Hollister Gallery in Wellesley, MA, and “73,000 waiting” at Chicago Artists Coalition in Chicago, IL in October 2015. Her workshops include “Immigrant Takeover” at the Center for Craft, Creativity and Design in Ashville, NC, and “US Citizenship Test Sampler” at the Smithsonian Institution. She is a City of Chicago DCASE grant and Puffin Foundation Ltd grant recipient. Han earned her B.A. in Art and Latin American Studies from the University of California, Berkeley in 2008, and her M.F.A. in Fiber and Material Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2013. She is currently a Lecturer at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Sewing is a time-based practice. Fiber as a medium speaks a language of accessibility, intimacy, and time. From its inception, it has been touched. To sew, the hand, armed with a needle, pierces the cloth, pulls the needle up, pierces the cloth, and pulls the needle down. Each sewn thread creates an indexical line of invested time, gesture, and rhythm. As an artist I use this needle and thread to mine from my experiences as an immigrant to address issues of labor and identity politics. I try to unpack these complex labor and immigrant histories by engaging with people through long term projects utilizing varied social practices. At the root, is a research-based practice revolved around collecting materials: oral histories, data, commissioned artifacts, handmade objects, and remnants of handwork. I then invest in the materials with my own hands with time and labor in order to create large-scale installations and meticulously labor intensive works. However, being about invisible and Sisyphean labor, my works rarely suggest finality. The needle is a political tool. It pierces and binds membranes together. The thread that it steers is tied off and remains while the needle continues to bind and mend. In my art practice, I use that needle to stitch together various histories and discourses revolving around the simple act of sewing. However, this act is anything but uncomplicated. The creation of each stitch engages sewing’s complex histories and politics of traditional, industrial, feminist, immigrant, and artist labor.

location

X
  • Born: Seoul, South Korea
  • Based: Chicago, IL, USA

comments

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A Mend: A Collection of Scraps from Local Seamstresses and Tailors (Chicago)

Aram Han Sifuentes

2011 - 2013 Jean scraps and gold denim thread 14 ft. x 10 ft. x 4 ft. Courtesy of the artist Photo credit: Hyounsang Yoo

contributor

X

Aram Han Sifuentes

b. 1986
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Aram Han Sifuentes is a social practice fiber artist and works closely with Chicago-based non-profit organizations, community centers, and public schools to facilitate workshops for immigrant communities. She has exhibited her work nationally and internationally. Her solo exhibitions include “A Mend” at Hollister Gallery in Wellesley, MA, and “73,000 waiting” at Chicago Artists Coalition in Chicago, IL in October 2015. Her workshops include “Immigrant Takeover” at the Center for Craft, Creativity and Design in Ashville, NC, and “US Citizenship Test Sampler” at the Smithsonian Institution. She is a City of Chicago DCASE grant and Puffin Foundation Ltd grant recipient. Han earned her B.A. in Art and Latin American Studies from the University of California, Berkeley in 2008, and her M.F.A. in Fiber and Material Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2013. She is currently a Lecturer at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Sewing is a time-based practice. Fiber as a medium speaks a language of accessibility, intimacy, and time. From its inception, it has been touched. To sew, the hand, armed with a needle, pierces the cloth, pulls the needle up, pierces the cloth, and pulls the needle down. Each sewn thread creates an indexical line of invested time, gesture, and rhythm. As an artist I use this needle and thread to mine from my experiences as an immigrant to address issues of labor and identity politics. I try to unpack these complex labor and immigrant histories by engaging with people through long term projects utilizing varied social practices. At the root, is a research-based practice revolved around collecting materials: oral histories, data, commissioned artifacts, handmade objects, and remnants of handwork. I then invest in the materials with my own hands with time and labor in order to create large-scale installations and meticulously labor intensive works. However, being about invisible and Sisyphean labor, my works rarely suggest finality. The needle is a political tool. It pierces and binds membranes together. The thread that it steers is tied off and remains while the needle continues to bind and mend. In my art practice, I use that needle to stitch together various histories and discourses revolving around the simple act of sewing. However, this act is anything but uncomplicated. The creation of each stitch engages sewing’s complex histories and politics of traditional, industrial, feminist, immigrant, and artist labor.

location

X
  • Born: Seoul, South Korea
  • Based: Chicago, IL, USA

comments

X

A Mend: A Collection of Scraps from Local Seamstresses and Tailors (Chicago)

Aram Han Sifuentes

2011 - 2013 Jean scraps and gold denim thread 14 ft. x 10 ft. x 4 ft. Courtesy of the artist Photo credit: Hyounsang Yoo

contributor

X

Aram Han Sifuentes

b. 1986
image description
  • See All Works
  • visit website

Aram Han Sifuentes is a social practice fiber artist and works closely with Chicago-based non-profit organizations, community centers, and public schools to facilitate workshops for immigrant communities. She has exhibited her work nationally and internationally. Her solo exhibitions include “A Mend” at Hollister Gallery in Wellesley, MA, and “73,000 waiting” at Chicago Artists Coalition in Chicago, IL in October 2015. Her workshops include “Immigrant Takeover” at the Center for Craft, Creativity and Design in Ashville, NC, and “US Citizenship Test Sampler” at the Smithsonian Institution. She is a City of Chicago DCASE grant and Puffin Foundation Ltd grant recipient. Han earned her B.A. in Art and Latin American Studies from the University of California, Berkeley in 2008, and her M.F.A. in Fiber and Material Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2013. She is currently a Lecturer at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Sewing is a time-based practice. Fiber as a medium speaks a language of accessibility, intimacy, and time. From its inception, it has been touched. To sew, the hand, armed with a needle, pierces the cloth, pulls the needle up, pierces the cloth, and pulls the needle down. Each sewn thread creates an indexical line of invested time, gesture, and rhythm. As an artist I use this needle and thread to mine from my experiences as an immigrant to address issues of labor and identity politics. I try to unpack these complex labor and immigrant histories by engaging with people through long term projects utilizing varied social practices. At the root, is a research-based practice revolved around collecting materials: oral histories, data, commissioned artifacts, handmade objects, and remnants of handwork. I then invest in the materials with my own hands with time and labor in order to create large-scale installations and meticulously labor intensive works. However, being about invisible and Sisyphean labor, my works rarely suggest finality. The needle is a political tool. It pierces and binds membranes together. The thread that it steers is tied off and remains while the needle continues to bind and mend. In my art practice, I use that needle to stitch together various histories and discourses revolving around the simple act of sewing. However, this act is anything but uncomplicated. The creation of each stitch engages sewing’s complex histories and politics of traditional, industrial, feminist, immigrant, and artist labor.

location

X
  • Born: Seoul, South Korea
  • Based: Chicago, IL, USA

comments

X

contributor

X

Aram Han Sifuentes

b. 1986
image description
  • See All Works
  • visit website

Aram Han Sifuentes is a social practice fiber artist and works closely with Chicago-based non-profit organizations, community centers, and public schools to facilitate workshops for immigrant communities. She has exhibited her work nationally and internationally. Her solo exhibitions include “A Mend” at Hollister Gallery in Wellesley, MA, and “73,000 waiting” at Chicago Artists Coalition in Chicago, IL in October 2015. Her workshops include “Immigrant Takeover” at the Center for Craft, Creativity and Design in Ashville, NC, and “US Citizenship Test Sampler” at the Smithsonian Institution. She is a City of Chicago DCASE grant and Puffin Foundation Ltd grant recipient. Han earned her B.A. in Art and Latin American Studies from the University of California, Berkeley in 2008, and her M.F.A. in Fiber and Material Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2013. She is currently a Lecturer at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Sewing is a time-based practice. Fiber as a medium speaks a language of accessibility, intimacy, and time. From its inception, it has been touched. To sew, the hand, armed with a needle, pierces the cloth, pulls the needle up, pierces the cloth, and pulls the needle down. Each sewn thread creates an indexical line of invested time, gesture, and rhythm. As an artist I use this needle and thread to mine from my experiences as an immigrant to address issues of labor and identity politics. I try to unpack these complex labor and immigrant histories by engaging with people through long term projects utilizing varied social practices. At the root, is a research-based practice revolved around collecting materials: oral histories, data, commissioned artifacts, handmade objects, and remnants of handwork. I then invest in the materials with my own hands with time and labor in order to create large-scale installations and meticulously labor intensive works. However, being about invisible and Sisyphean labor, my works rarely suggest finality. The needle is a political tool. It pierces and binds membranes together. The thread that it steers is tied off and remains while the needle continues to bind and mend. In my art practice, I use that needle to stitch together various histories and discourses revolving around the simple act of sewing. However, this act is anything but uncomplicated. The creation of each stitch engages sewing’s complex histories and politics of traditional, industrial, feminist, immigrant, and artist labor.

location

X
  • Born: Seoul, South Korea
  • Based: Chicago, IL, USA

comments

X

Baking McMansion

Bovey Lee

2011 Chinese xuan (rice) paper on silk, hand cut 24 in. x 30.5 in. Courtesy of Bovey Lee

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Bovey Lee

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I am a cut paper artist currently based in Los Angeles, California, USA. Born in Hong Kong and having practiced Chinese calligraphy since the age of ten, I studied painting and drawing in my formative years and completed my B.A. degree in Fine Arts at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. In 1993, I came to the United States as a painter and earned my first Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of California at Berkeley. Subsequently, I earned a second M.F.A. in computer graphics and interactive media at Pratt Institute in New York in 1999. From 2000-2014, I lived and worked in Pittsburgh where I created my first cut paper work in summer 2005. Since 2008, I have maintained a full-time studio practice. Exhibitions include Museum Kunst der Westkueste, Foehr, Germany; Museum of Craft & Design, San Francisco; Nevada Museum of Art; Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum, Arizona; Cornell Museum of Art & American Culture, Delray Beach, Florida; Wing Luke Museum, Seattle, Washington; Brooklyn Museum of Art; Shelburne Museum, Vermont; Museum Bellerive, Zurich, Switzerland; National Glass Centre, Sunderland, UK; Blackburn Museum, UK; Museum of Fine Arts, Beijing, China; Fukuoka Museum of Art, Japan; Hong Kong Museum of Art; Museum Rijswijk, The Netherlands; among others. Over a dozen books featuring my cut paper include Paper Secret I&II (Hightone, Guangzhou); Paper Play (Sandu, Guangzhou); Freehand (Chronicle Book, San Francisco); 500 Paper Objects (Lark Crafts, Asheville); Art of Paper (Monsa, Barcelona); Paradise of Paper Art (Designerbooks, Beijing); Material World (Virgin Books, London); Paper Works (Sandu, Guangzhou); Push Paper (Lark Books, New York); l’art de la decoupe (Editions Alternatives, Paris); The New Encyclopedia of Origami and Papercraft Techniques (Quarto, London); and High Touch, Illusive 3, Papercraft 2, and Papercraft (Gestalten, Berlin). Institutional collections include the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology, Oxford University, UK; Pacific Asia Museum, Pasadena, California; Hong Kong Museum of Art; The Chinese University of Hong Kong; BNY Mellon Corporate Art Collection; Fidelity Corporate Art Collection; Headland Capital Partners, Greater China & Asia; Park Hyatt Sanya, China; and Progressive Corporate Art Collection. Corporate commissions and editorials include Lancome, China; APM, Hong Kong; The Washington Post; Panasonic; The New York Times Magazine; Art@Government Buildings, Hong Kong; Hugo Boss; Pacific Place, Hong Kong; F.P. Journe; and Annabelle Magazine, Switzerland; among others. Grotto Fine Art in Hong Kong; Rena Bransten Gallery in San Francisco, California; and Gavlak Gallery in Palm Beach, Florida and Los Angeles, California represent my works. Selected works are also available at Fost Gallery, Singapore.

My hand cut paper explores the tension between man and the environment in the context of power, sacrifice, and survival. These three “motivators,” as I call them, drive all our desires and behaviors toward one another and the environment. We live in a time when we overdo everything from technology to urbanization to consumption. My recent work is informed by our precarious relationship with nature in the twenty-first century, i.e., what we do to the environment with our super machines and technologies and what nature does back to us in reaction. I hand cut each work on a single sheet of Chinese xuan (rice) paper backed with silk; both are renewable and eco-friendly materials. The tools I use are simple: a cutting mat, an X-acto knife and blades, staples, clips, and paperweights. Before the final hand cutting process, I compose the images using the computer and software. I then print out the digital images and use them to cut with. The images are photographic and I translate them into patterns of solid and void, while cutting free-hand without any rulers or stencils. My work is like drawing with a knife and is rooted in my study of Chinese calligraphy and pencil drawing. Cutting paper is a visceral reaction and natural response to my affection for immediacy, detail, and subtlety. The physical and mental demand from cutting is extreme and thrilling; it slows me down and allows me to think clearly and decisively.

location

X
  • Born: Hong Kong, China
  • Based: Los Angeles, CA, USA

comments

X

Baking McMansion (detail)

Bovey Lee

2011 Chinese xuan (rice) paper on silk, hand cut 24 in. x 30.5 in. Courtesy of Bovey Lee

contributor

X

Bovey Lee

image description
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I am a cut paper artist currently based in Los Angeles, California, USA. Born in Hong Kong and having practiced Chinese calligraphy since the age of ten, I studied painting and drawing in my formative years and completed my B.A. degree in Fine Arts at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. In 1993, I came to the United States as a painter and earned my first Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of California at Berkeley. Subsequently, I earned a second M.F.A. in computer graphics and interactive media at Pratt Institute in New York in 1999. From 2000-2014, I lived and worked in Pittsburgh where I created my first cut paper work in summer 2005. Since 2008, I have maintained a full-time studio practice. Exhibitions include Museum Kunst der Westkueste, Foehr, Germany; Museum of Craft & Design, San Francisco; Nevada Museum of Art; Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum, Arizona; Cornell Museum of Art & American Culture, Delray Beach, Florida; Wing Luke Museum, Seattle, Washington; Brooklyn Museum of Art; Shelburne Museum, Vermont; Museum Bellerive, Zurich, Switzerland; National Glass Centre, Sunderland, UK; Blackburn Museum, UK; Museum of Fine Arts, Beijing, China; Fukuoka Museum of Art, Japan; Hong Kong Museum of Art; Museum Rijswijk, The Netherlands; among others. Over a dozen books featuring my cut paper include Paper Secret I&II (Hightone, Guangzhou); Paper Play (Sandu, Guangzhou); Freehand (Chronicle Book, San Francisco); 500 Paper Objects (Lark Crafts, Asheville); Art of Paper (Monsa, Barcelona); Paradise of Paper Art (Designerbooks, Beijing); Material World (Virgin Books, London); Paper Works (Sandu, Guangzhou); Push Paper (Lark Books, New York); l’art de la decoupe (Editions Alternatives, Paris); The New Encyclopedia of Origami and Papercraft Techniques (Quarto, London); and High Touch, Illusive 3, Papercraft 2, and Papercraft (Gestalten, Berlin). Institutional collections include the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology, Oxford University, UK; Pacific Asia Museum, Pasadena, California; Hong Kong Museum of Art; The Chinese University of Hong Kong; BNY Mellon Corporate Art Collection; Fidelity Corporate Art Collection; Headland Capital Partners, Greater China & Asia; Park Hyatt Sanya, China; and Progressive Corporate Art Collection. Corporate commissions and editorials include Lancome, China; APM, Hong Kong; The Washington Post; Panasonic; The New York Times Magazine; Art@Government Buildings, Hong Kong; Hugo Boss; Pacific Place, Hong Kong; F.P. Journe; and Annabelle Magazine, Switzerland; among others. Grotto Fine Art in Hong Kong; Rena Bransten Gallery in San Francisco, California; and Gavlak Gallery in Palm Beach, Florida and Los Angeles, California represent my works. Selected works are also available at Fost Gallery, Singapore.

My hand cut paper explores the tension between man and the environment in the context of power, sacrifice, and survival. These three “motivators,” as I call them, drive all our desires and behaviors toward one another and the environment. We live in a time when we overdo everything from technology to urbanization to consumption. My recent work is informed by our precarious relationship with nature in the twenty-first century, i.e., what we do to the environment with our super machines and technologies and what nature does back to us in reaction. I hand cut each work on a single sheet of Chinese xuan (rice) paper backed with silk; both are renewable and eco-friendly materials. The tools I use are simple: a cutting mat, an X-acto knife and blades, staples, clips, and paperweights. Before the final hand cutting process, I compose the images using the computer and software. I then print out the digital images and use them to cut with. The images are photographic and I translate them into patterns of solid and void, while cutting free-hand without any rulers or stencils. My work is like drawing with a knife and is rooted in my study of Chinese calligraphy and pencil drawing. Cutting paper is a visceral reaction and natural response to my affection for immediacy, detail, and subtlety. The physical and mental demand from cutting is extreme and thrilling; it slows me down and allows me to think clearly and decisively.

location

X
  • Born: Hong Kong, China
  • Based: Los Angeles, CA, USA

comments

X

Baking McMansion (detail)

Bovey Lee

2011 Chinese xuan (rice) paper on silk, hand cut 24 in. x 30.5 in. Courtesy of Bovey Lee

contributor

X

Bovey Lee

image description
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I am a cut paper artist currently based in Los Angeles, California, USA. Born in Hong Kong and having practiced Chinese calligraphy since the age of ten, I studied painting and drawing in my formative years and completed my B.A. degree in Fine Arts at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. In 1993, I came to the United States as a painter and earned my first Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of California at Berkeley. Subsequently, I earned a second M.F.A. in computer graphics and interactive media at Pratt Institute in New York in 1999. From 2000-2014, I lived and worked in Pittsburgh where I created my first cut paper work in summer 2005. Since 2008, I have maintained a full-time studio practice. Exhibitions include Museum Kunst der Westkueste, Foehr, Germany; Museum of Craft & Design, San Francisco; Nevada Museum of Art; Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum, Arizona; Cornell Museum of Art & American Culture, Delray Beach, Florida; Wing Luke Museum, Seattle, Washington; Brooklyn Museum of Art; Shelburne Museum, Vermont; Museum Bellerive, Zurich, Switzerland; National Glass Centre, Sunderland, UK; Blackburn Museum, UK; Museum of Fine Arts, Beijing, China; Fukuoka Museum of Art, Japan; Hong Kong Museum of Art; Museum Rijswijk, The Netherlands; among others. Over a dozen books featuring my cut paper include Paper Secret I&II (Hightone, Guangzhou); Paper Play (Sandu, Guangzhou); Freehand (Chronicle Book, San Francisco); 500 Paper Objects (Lark Crafts, Asheville); Art of Paper (Monsa, Barcelona); Paradise of Paper Art (Designerbooks, Beijing); Material World (Virgin Books, London); Paper Works (Sandu, Guangzhou); Push Paper (Lark Books, New York); l’art de la decoupe (Editions Alternatives, Paris); The New Encyclopedia of Origami and Papercraft Techniques (Quarto, London); and High Touch, Illusive 3, Papercraft 2, and Papercraft (Gestalten, Berlin). Institutional collections include the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology, Oxford University, UK; Pacific Asia Museum, Pasadena, California; Hong Kong Museum of Art; The Chinese University of Hong Kong; BNY Mellon Corporate Art Collection; Fidelity Corporate Art Collection; Headland Capital Partners, Greater China & Asia; Park Hyatt Sanya, China; and Progressive Corporate Art Collection. Corporate commissions and editorials include Lancome, China; APM, Hong Kong; The Washington Post; Panasonic; The New York Times Magazine; Art@Government Buildings, Hong Kong; Hugo Boss; Pacific Place, Hong Kong; F.P. Journe; and Annabelle Magazine, Switzerland; among others. Grotto Fine Art in Hong Kong; Rena Bransten Gallery in San Francisco, California; and Gavlak Gallery in Palm Beach, Florida and Los Angeles, California represent my works. Selected works are also available at Fost Gallery, Singapore.

My hand cut paper explores the tension between man and the environment in the context of power, sacrifice, and survival. These three “motivators,” as I call them, drive all our desires and behaviors toward one another and the environment. We live in a time when we overdo everything from technology to urbanization to consumption. My recent work is informed by our precarious relationship with nature in the twenty-first century, i.e., what we do to the environment with our super machines and technologies and what nature does back to us in reaction. I hand cut each work on a single sheet of Chinese xuan (rice) paper backed with silk; both are renewable and eco-friendly materials. The tools I use are simple: a cutting mat, an X-acto knife and blades, staples, clips, and paperweights. Before the final hand cutting process, I compose the images using the computer and software. I then print out the digital images and use them to cut with. The images are photographic and I translate them into patterns of solid and void, while cutting free-hand without any rulers or stencils. My work is like drawing with a knife and is rooted in my study of Chinese calligraphy and pencil drawing. Cutting paper is a visceral reaction and natural response to my affection for immediacy, detail, and subtlety. The physical and mental demand from cutting is extreme and thrilling; it slows me down and allows me to think clearly and decisively.

location

X
  • Born: Hong Kong, China
  • Based: Los Angeles, CA, USA

comments

X

Baking McMansion (detail)

Bovey Lee

2011 Chinese xuan (rice) paper on silk, hand cut 24 in. x 30.5 in. Courtesy of Bovey Lee

contributor

X

Bovey Lee

image description
  • See All Works
  • facebook
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I am a cut paper artist currently based in Los Angeles, California, USA. Born in Hong Kong and having practiced Chinese calligraphy since the age of ten, I studied painting and drawing in my formative years and completed my B.A. degree in Fine Arts at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. In 1993, I came to the United States as a painter and earned my first Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of California at Berkeley. Subsequently, I earned a second M.F.A. in computer graphics and interactive media at Pratt Institute in New York in 1999. From 2000-2014, I lived and worked in Pittsburgh where I created my first cut paper work in summer 2005. Since 2008, I have maintained a full-time studio practice. Exhibitions include Museum Kunst der Westkueste, Foehr, Germany; Museum of Craft & Design, San Francisco; Nevada Museum of Art; Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum, Arizona; Cornell Museum of Art & American Culture, Delray Beach, Florida; Wing Luke Museum, Seattle, Washington; Brooklyn Museum of Art; Shelburne Museum, Vermont; Museum Bellerive, Zurich, Switzerland; National Glass Centre, Sunderland, UK; Blackburn Museum, UK; Museum of Fine Arts, Beijing, China; Fukuoka Museum of Art, Japan; Hong Kong Museum of Art; Museum Rijswijk, The Netherlands; among others. Over a dozen books featuring my cut paper include Paper Secret I&II (Hightone, Guangzhou); Paper Play (Sandu, Guangzhou); Freehand (Chronicle Book, San Francisco); 500 Paper Objects (Lark Crafts, Asheville); Art of Paper (Monsa, Barcelona); Paradise of Paper Art (Designerbooks, Beijing); Material World (Virgin Books, London); Paper Works (Sandu, Guangzhou); Push Paper (Lark Books, New York); l’art de la decoupe (Editions Alternatives, Paris); The New Encyclopedia of Origami and Papercraft Techniques (Quarto, London); and High Touch, Illusive 3, Papercraft 2, and Papercraft (Gestalten, Berlin). Institutional collections include the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology, Oxford University, UK; Pacific Asia Museum, Pasadena, California; Hong Kong Museum of Art; The Chinese University of Hong Kong; BNY Mellon Corporate Art Collection; Fidelity Corporate Art Collection; Headland Capital Partners, Greater China & Asia; Park Hyatt Sanya, China; and Progressive Corporate Art Collection. Corporate commissions and editorials include Lancome, China; APM, Hong Kong; The Washington Post; Panasonic; The New York Times Magazine; Art@Government Buildings, Hong Kong; Hugo Boss; Pacific Place, Hong Kong; F.P. Journe; and Annabelle Magazine, Switzerland; among others. Grotto Fine Art in Hong Kong; Rena Bransten Gallery in San Francisco, California; and Gavlak Gallery in Palm Beach, Florida and Los Angeles, California represent my works. Selected works are also available at Fost Gallery, Singapore.

My hand cut paper explores the tension between man and the environment in the context of power, sacrifice, and survival. These three “motivators,” as I call them, drive all our desires and behaviors toward one another and the environment. We live in a time when we overdo everything from technology to urbanization to consumption. My recent work is informed by our precarious relationship with nature in the twenty-first century, i.e., what we do to the environment with our super machines and technologies and what nature does back to us in reaction. I hand cut each work on a single sheet of Chinese xuan (rice) paper backed with silk; both are renewable and eco-friendly materials. The tools I use are simple: a cutting mat, an X-acto knife and blades, staples, clips, and paperweights. Before the final hand cutting process, I compose the images using the computer and software. I then print out the digital images and use them to cut with. The images are photographic and I translate them into patterns of solid and void, while cutting free-hand without any rulers or stencils. My work is like drawing with a knife and is rooted in my study of Chinese calligraphy and pencil drawing. Cutting paper is a visceral reaction and natural response to my affection for immediacy, detail, and subtlety. The physical and mental demand from cutting is extreme and thrilling; it slows me down and allows me to think clearly and decisively.

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  • Born: Hong Kong, China
  • Based: Los Angeles, CA, USA

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Brown Chanel Handbag

Stephanie Syjuco

2006 - 2015 Photograph of crochet project Courtesy of the artist From "The Counterfeit Crochet Project (Critique of a Political Economy)

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Stephanie Syjuco

b. 1974
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Stephanie Syjuco creates large-scale spectacles of collected cultural objects, cumulative archives, and temporary vending installations, often with an active public component that invites viewers to directly participate as producers or distributors. Working primarily in sculpture and installation, her projects leverage open-source systems, shareware logic, and flows of capital, creating frictions between high ideals and everyday materials. This has included starting a global collaborative project with crochet crafters to counterfeit high-end consumer goods; presenting a parasitic art counterfeiting event, "COPYSTAND: An Autonomous Manufacturing Zone" for Frieze Projects, London (2009); and “Shadowshop,” an alternative vending outlet embedded at The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art exploring the ways in which artists are navigating the production, consumption, and dissemination of their work (2010-11). A recent collaboration with the  FLACC Workplace for Visual Artists in Genk, Belgium, involved 3-D scanning of Belgian and Congolese antiquities to produce hybrid ceramic objects addressing the legacy of colonialism, empire, and trade routes.
 
Born in the Philippines, she received her M.F.A. from Stanford University and B.F.A. from the San Francisco Art Institute. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including a 2014 John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship Award and a 2009 Joan Mitchell Painters and Sculptors Award. Her work has been included in exhibitions at Museum of Modern Art PS1 In New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, The 12th Havana Biennale, The Bucharest Biennale, The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, ZKM Center for Art and Technology, Germany; Z33 Space for Contemporary Art, Belgium; Universal Studios Gallery Beijing; and the California Biennial at the Orange County Museum of Art, among others. She is an Assistant Professor in Sculpture at the University of California, Berkeley, and lives and works in San Francisco.

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  • Born: The Philippines
  • Based: San Francisco, CA, USA

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