curated exhibition

Storm: A Typhoon Haiyan Recovery Project

What survives in the wake of a storm? One year after Super Typhoon Haiyan, Storm assembles a community of responders. Storm chronicles the creativity generated despite and beyond Haiyan's destruction.

 

The Philippines is exposed to about nineteen tropical cyclones per year. But in November 2013 Typhoon Haiyan became the worst disaster in the history of the Philippines. Haiyan killed more than 6,300 people, cost over $2 billion in damages, and affected over 16 million people.  

 

Our world increasingly is defined by disasters. We have witnessed catastrophes of apocalyptic proportions from storms like Haiyan and Katrina (United States 2005) to earthquakes like Fukushima (Japan 2011) and Port-au-Prince  (Haiti 2010).  During our curatorial process, some of the contributors to this exhibition faced new storms like Typhoons Rammasun, Fung Wong, and Vong Fong.

 

So this is not another moment of silence. We honor the dead with the noise of discontent. We also strive to reflect the radical love that propels efforts to support our kababayan. Little by little, each gesture of hope decenters the typhoon. Each act of hope reveals the people’s determination to recover.

 

Immerse yourself in the different dimensions of the healing process. From scholarly structural critiques to youth-initiated fundraisers. From poetic and musical renditions of collective grief to Hip Hop flash mobs to raise awareness.

 

Celebrate the indomitable human spirit and kapwa never lost in the flood.

 

Co-curated by Johanna F. Almiron and J. Lorenzo Perillo.

November 2014

 

For more information about community organizations that continue to help in the relief effort, navigate to the National Alliance for Filipino Concerns at http://nafconusa.org/ and CARE at http://care.org/emergencies/typhoon-haiyan.

 

Contributors:

Chelo A. and Xien How

Amanda Solomon Amorao

Christian Almiron of Gentei Kaijo

Jennifer Almiron

Ray Basa and Raffy Piamonte

Nana Buxani

Jeff Arellano Cabusao

Critical Filipina/Filipino Studies Collective

Francesco Conte

Franz DG

Rodrigo de la Peña

Hannah Dormido

Hip Hop Dance Association

Francis Estrada

Joel Kahn

Joseph Legaspi

Dindo Llana

Enrico Maniago

Isabel Manalo

Alex Orquiza

Lordy Rodriguez

Robyn Rodriguez

Catcher, Carver and Jhoanna Salazar

E. San Juan Jr.

Janice Sapigao

Melissa Sipin


Special thanks to the American Studies Association, Valerie Francisco, Erwin Mendoza, Anna Sarao, Gina Rosales, Emerson Aquino, Arnel Calvario, Kim Alidio, National Alliance for Filipino Concerns, and Father Alvin Cabacang.

Stormed

Fran Atopos Conte

Jun 2014 Video documentary 39m 49s Courtesy of Fran Atopos Conte

contributor

X

Fran Atopos Conte

b. 1981
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Fran Atopos is a graduate of Philosophy and Political Science, professional journalist since 2009. Avid traveler, he published two travel books, about Brazil and Libya. He is very interested in the Philippines, where he spent a few months.

Fran is the founder of an art collective called Atopos and is very fond of collaborating with other artists and filmmakers.

“Stormed” is about two natural disasters in the Philippines: Sendong, and Haiyan. The documentary is divided in two parts, the first taking place in Cagayan de Oro, Mindanao, and the second part showing the disaster caused by Haiyan in the island of Bantayan, in Cebu. 
 
Narratively, “Stormed” acts like an impersonal documentary in the first part, while taking a more character driven story feature in the latter part, dedicated to the reconstruction in Bantayan after Haiyan.
 
“Stormed” features interviews with survivors, academics and two activists from a Bantayan NGO called “Back to Sea”. The Cagayan de Oro part was filmed with the local support of Cdo director Joe Bacus and film makers Jeffrie Po, Mona Sun and Learon Dekada.

location

X
  • Born: Florence, Italy
  • Based: Rome, Italy

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Flash Flood

Isabel Manalo

2010 Photographs and acrylic on Yupo paper 22" x 30" Courtesy of the artist

contributor

X

Isabel Manalo

b. 1968
image description
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Isabel Manalo is a multi-media visual artist, educator and curator. From 2000 - 2012, Isabel taught at American University's Department of Art both as an Adjunct and Visiting Assistant Professor. She served on the Board of Directors and the Visual Arts Committee for the District of Columbia Arts Center from 2010 - 2012. Her work is represented in Washington D.C. by Addison Ripley Fine Art where she has had two solo shows in 2009 and 2012 and now 2015. This past spring she exhibited a site specific installation at the new works gallery at the Orlando Museum of Art. She is also preparing for a solo exhibit at the Paul Zuccaire Gallery at the University of Stonybrook, Long Island, NY for February 2016. 

Isabel is also an Independent Curator and the Founder and Director of The Studio Visit (TSV), an online art journal featuring artists in their studios. Her experience as an academic educator inspired the creation of TSV in 2008. The focus on studio practice and process is the emphasis of TSV and further empasizes this mission through the art critique -- a fundamental social dialogue that balances the necessary solitary nature of independent studio rigor. Please see TSV's website to find out more about both the virtual and physical programming TSV offers.

She is currently living and working in Berlin where she served in 2012 -2013 as a Visiting Artist and Curator at Takt International Artist Residency where she conducts weekly art critiques and seminars for the artists in residence and curated them in group shows. Her expertise, scholarship and passion support and promote visual artists working in all mediums and career levels. In July 2011, She curated a group show in Washington D.C. at Addison Ripley Fine Art called "CultureScape" featuring the work of five emerging artists: Mei Mei Chang, Bridget Sue Lambert, Lisa Blas, Hedieh Ilchi and Elise Richman. She recently curated "Outside In" this past October 2012, a site specific installation that was on view this past October in Berlin executed by two Washington D.C. artists Megan Muller and Sam Scharf.

As an artist, Isabel has been showing her work internationally since 1999.  Her work is a part of numerous private and public collections including the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, the permanent collections of the US Embassies in Bulgaria, Kazakhtsan and Nepal to name a few. Her work has been shown at the McLean Project for the Arts, Arlington Art Center, Maryland Art Place, the Katzen Arts Center, and the Corcoran Gallery of Art and has been the subject of group and solo shows in Baltimore, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Philadelphia and New York. She was featured in New American Paintings in 2004 and 2006 and was awarded a Fellowship at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts in 2008, 2009 and 2011 with support from the Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation for 2009. Manalo's work is included in the Drawing Center and White Columns curated artist registries.

Isabel received her MFA in Painting from Yale University, a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a BA from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

My work has become more about the hand and less about the image. It is less about the abstraction of space but rather the abstraction of language and the  image of the Baybayin as manifest with thread and collage on different surfaces of paper. Using the pre-colonial alphabet from the Philippines -- called the Baybayin -- is a way to communicate my deepest thoughts through the written word, yet in a script that isn’t used anymore nor can be read or necessarily accessed by the general public. While it is clearly a written form, the process becomes visual for me.
 
I stitch the calligraphic lines as if I was stitching a wound. The process of sewing reminds me of my mother and the endless hours she spent sewing dresses for my sisters and myself. It was a large part of her identity and by including the sewing; it makes her present in this body of work almost akin to painting a narrative portrait of her.
 
Paint becomes blisters; photographs are cut and glued like pretty Band-Aids we see at the local drug stores. It resolves into a tactile discomfort of thread, knots, paint boils and cut paper that evokes a life that is uncontrolled, but hoping to be beautiful, somehow. Stitching the Seam,the title of my solo show at the Orlando Museum of Art that opened on March 6, 2014, refers to the multitude of feelings that connect me to the minutiae of everyday, to the tragic and spectacular of the bigger planet we endeavor to call home.

location

X
  • Born: USA
  • Based: Berlin, Germany
  • Also Based in: Washington, DC, USA

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Montana Burning

Isabel Manalo

2009 Acrylic and enamel on gessoboard 30" x 30" Courtesy of the artist Collection of the U.S. Embassy in the Philippines

contributor

X

Isabel Manalo

b. 1968
image description
  • See All Works
  • visit website

Isabel Manalo is a multi-media visual artist, educator and curator. From 2000 - 2012, Isabel taught at American University's Department of Art both as an Adjunct and Visiting Assistant Professor. She served on the Board of Directors and the Visual Arts Committee for the District of Columbia Arts Center from 2010 - 2012. Her work is represented in Washington D.C. by Addison Ripley Fine Art where she has had two solo shows in 2009 and 2012 and now 2015. This past spring she exhibited a site specific installation at the new works gallery at the Orlando Museum of Art. She is also preparing for a solo exhibit at the Paul Zuccaire Gallery at the University of Stonybrook, Long Island, NY for February 2016. 

Isabel is also an Independent Curator and the Founder and Director of The Studio Visit (TSV), an online art journal featuring artists in their studios. Her experience as an academic educator inspired the creation of TSV in 2008. The focus on studio practice and process is the emphasis of TSV and further empasizes this mission through the art critique -- a fundamental social dialogue that balances the necessary solitary nature of independent studio rigor. Please see TSV's website to find out more about both the virtual and physical programming TSV offers.

She is currently living and working in Berlin where she served in 2012 -2013 as a Visiting Artist and Curator at Takt International Artist Residency where she conducts weekly art critiques and seminars for the artists in residence and curated them in group shows. Her expertise, scholarship and passion support and promote visual artists working in all mediums and career levels. In July 2011, She curated a group show in Washington D.C. at Addison Ripley Fine Art called "CultureScape" featuring the work of five emerging artists: Mei Mei Chang, Bridget Sue Lambert, Lisa Blas, Hedieh Ilchi and Elise Richman. She recently curated "Outside In" this past October 2012, a site specific installation that was on view this past October in Berlin executed by two Washington D.C. artists Megan Muller and Sam Scharf.

As an artist, Isabel has been showing her work internationally since 1999.  Her work is a part of numerous private and public collections including the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, the permanent collections of the US Embassies in Bulgaria, Kazakhtsan and Nepal to name a few. Her work has been shown at the McLean Project for the Arts, Arlington Art Center, Maryland Art Place, the Katzen Arts Center, and the Corcoran Gallery of Art and has been the subject of group and solo shows in Baltimore, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Philadelphia and New York. She was featured in New American Paintings in 2004 and 2006 and was awarded a Fellowship at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts in 2008, 2009 and 2011 with support from the Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation for 2009. Manalo's work is included in the Drawing Center and White Columns curated artist registries.

Isabel received her MFA in Painting from Yale University, a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a BA from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

My work has become more about the hand and less about the image. It is less about the abstraction of space but rather the abstraction of language and the  image of the Baybayin as manifest with thread and collage on different surfaces of paper. Using the pre-colonial alphabet from the Philippines -- called the Baybayin -- is a way to communicate my deepest thoughts through the written word, yet in a script that isn’t used anymore nor can be read or necessarily accessed by the general public. While it is clearly a written form, the process becomes visual for me.
 
I stitch the calligraphic lines as if I was stitching a wound. The process of sewing reminds me of my mother and the endless hours she spent sewing dresses for my sisters and myself. It was a large part of her identity and by including the sewing; it makes her present in this body of work almost akin to painting a narrative portrait of her.
 
Paint becomes blisters; photographs are cut and glued like pretty Band-Aids we see at the local drug stores. It resolves into a tactile discomfort of thread, knots, paint boils and cut paper that evokes a life that is uncontrolled, but hoping to be beautiful, somehow. Stitching the Seam,the title of my solo show at the Orlando Museum of Art that opened on March 6, 2014, refers to the multitude of feelings that connect me to the minutiae of everyday, to the tragic and spectacular of the bigger planet we endeavor to call home.

location

X
  • Born: USA
  • Based: Berlin, Germany
  • Also Based in: Washington, DC, USA

comments

X

Haiti

Isabel Manalo

2010 Acrylic and photographs on mylar 11” x 14” Courtesy of the artist

contributor

X

Isabel Manalo

b. 1968
image description
  • See All Works
  • visit website

Isabel Manalo is a multi-media visual artist, educator and curator. From 2000 - 2012, Isabel taught at American University's Department of Art both as an Adjunct and Visiting Assistant Professor. She served on the Board of Directors and the Visual Arts Committee for the District of Columbia Arts Center from 2010 - 2012. Her work is represented in Washington D.C. by Addison Ripley Fine Art where she has had two solo shows in 2009 and 2012 and now 2015. This past spring she exhibited a site specific installation at the new works gallery at the Orlando Museum of Art. She is also preparing for a solo exhibit at the Paul Zuccaire Gallery at the University of Stonybrook, Long Island, NY for February 2016. 

Isabel is also an Independent Curator and the Founder and Director of The Studio Visit (TSV), an online art journal featuring artists in their studios. Her experience as an academic educator inspired the creation of TSV in 2008. The focus on studio practice and process is the emphasis of TSV and further empasizes this mission through the art critique -- a fundamental social dialogue that balances the necessary solitary nature of independent studio rigor. Please see TSV's website to find out more about both the virtual and physical programming TSV offers.

She is currently living and working in Berlin where she served in 2012 -2013 as a Visiting Artist and Curator at Takt International Artist Residency where she conducts weekly art critiques and seminars for the artists in residence and curated them in group shows. Her expertise, scholarship and passion support and promote visual artists working in all mediums and career levels. In July 2011, She curated a group show in Washington D.C. at Addison Ripley Fine Art called "CultureScape" featuring the work of five emerging artists: Mei Mei Chang, Bridget Sue Lambert, Lisa Blas, Hedieh Ilchi and Elise Richman. She recently curated "Outside In" this past October 2012, a site specific installation that was on view this past October in Berlin executed by two Washington D.C. artists Megan Muller and Sam Scharf.

As an artist, Isabel has been showing her work internationally since 1999.  Her work is a part of numerous private and public collections including the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, the permanent collections of the US Embassies in Bulgaria, Kazakhtsan and Nepal to name a few. Her work has been shown at the McLean Project for the Arts, Arlington Art Center, Maryland Art Place, the Katzen Arts Center, and the Corcoran Gallery of Art and has been the subject of group and solo shows in Baltimore, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Philadelphia and New York. She was featured in New American Paintings in 2004 and 2006 and was awarded a Fellowship at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts in 2008, 2009 and 2011 with support from the Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation for 2009. Manalo's work is included in the Drawing Center and White Columns curated artist registries.

Isabel received her MFA in Painting from Yale University, a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a BA from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

My work has become more about the hand and less about the image. It is less about the abstraction of space but rather the abstraction of language and the  image of the Baybayin as manifest with thread and collage on different surfaces of paper. Using the pre-colonial alphabet from the Philippines -- called the Baybayin -- is a way to communicate my deepest thoughts through the written word, yet in a script that isn’t used anymore nor can be read or necessarily accessed by the general public. While it is clearly a written form, the process becomes visual for me.
 
I stitch the calligraphic lines as if I was stitching a wound. The process of sewing reminds me of my mother and the endless hours she spent sewing dresses for my sisters and myself. It was a large part of her identity and by including the sewing; it makes her present in this body of work almost akin to painting a narrative portrait of her.
 
Paint becomes blisters; photographs are cut and glued like pretty Band-Aids we see at the local drug stores. It resolves into a tactile discomfort of thread, knots, paint boils and cut paper that evokes a life that is uncontrolled, but hoping to be beautiful, somehow. Stitching the Seam,the title of my solo show at the Orlando Museum of Art that opened on March 6, 2014, refers to the multitude of feelings that connect me to the minutiae of everyday, to the tragic and spectacular of the bigger planet we endeavor to call home.

location

X
  • Born: USA
  • Based: Berlin, Germany
  • Also Based in: Washington, DC, USA

comments

X

Isang Araw

Isabel Manalo

2014 Acrylic, graphite, photographs on paper 65” x 72" Courtesy of the artist

contributor

X

Isabel Manalo

b. 1968
image description
  • See All Works
  • visit website

Isabel Manalo is a multi-media visual artist, educator and curator. From 2000 - 2012, Isabel taught at American University's Department of Art both as an Adjunct and Visiting Assistant Professor. She served on the Board of Directors and the Visual Arts Committee for the District of Columbia Arts Center from 2010 - 2012. Her work is represented in Washington D.C. by Addison Ripley Fine Art where she has had two solo shows in 2009 and 2012 and now 2015. This past spring she exhibited a site specific installation at the new works gallery at the Orlando Museum of Art. She is also preparing for a solo exhibit at the Paul Zuccaire Gallery at the University of Stonybrook, Long Island, NY for February 2016. 

Isabel is also an Independent Curator and the Founder and Director of The Studio Visit (TSV), an online art journal featuring artists in their studios. Her experience as an academic educator inspired the creation of TSV in 2008. The focus on studio practice and process is the emphasis of TSV and further empasizes this mission through the art critique -- a fundamental social dialogue that balances the necessary solitary nature of independent studio rigor. Please see TSV's website to find out more about both the virtual and physical programming TSV offers.

She is currently living and working in Berlin where she served in 2012 -2013 as a Visiting Artist and Curator at Takt International Artist Residency where she conducts weekly art critiques and seminars for the artists in residence and curated them in group shows. Her expertise, scholarship and passion support and promote visual artists working in all mediums and career levels. In July 2011, She curated a group show in Washington D.C. at Addison Ripley Fine Art called "CultureScape" featuring the work of five emerging artists: Mei Mei Chang, Bridget Sue Lambert, Lisa Blas, Hedieh Ilchi and Elise Richman. She recently curated "Outside In" this past October 2012, a site specific installation that was on view this past October in Berlin executed by two Washington D.C. artists Megan Muller and Sam Scharf.

As an artist, Isabel has been showing her work internationally since 1999.  Her work is a part of numerous private and public collections including the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, the permanent collections of the US Embassies in Bulgaria, Kazakhtsan and Nepal to name a few. Her work has been shown at the McLean Project for the Arts, Arlington Art Center, Maryland Art Place, the Katzen Arts Center, and the Corcoran Gallery of Art and has been the subject of group and solo shows in Baltimore, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Philadelphia and New York. She was featured in New American Paintings in 2004 and 2006 and was awarded a Fellowship at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts in 2008, 2009 and 2011 with support from the Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation for 2009. Manalo's work is included in the Drawing Center and White Columns curated artist registries.

Isabel received her MFA in Painting from Yale University, a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a BA from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

My work has become more about the hand and less about the image. It is less about the abstraction of space but rather the abstraction of language and the  image of the Baybayin as manifest with thread and collage on different surfaces of paper. Using the pre-colonial alphabet from the Philippines -- called the Baybayin -- is a way to communicate my deepest thoughts through the written word, yet in a script that isn’t used anymore nor can be read or necessarily accessed by the general public. While it is clearly a written form, the process becomes visual for me.
 
I stitch the calligraphic lines as if I was stitching a wound. The process of sewing reminds me of my mother and the endless hours she spent sewing dresses for my sisters and myself. It was a large part of her identity and by including the sewing; it makes her present in this body of work almost akin to painting a narrative portrait of her.
 
Paint becomes blisters; photographs are cut and glued like pretty Band-Aids we see at the local drug stores. It resolves into a tactile discomfort of thread, knots, paint boils and cut paper that evokes a life that is uncontrolled, but hoping to be beautiful, somehow. Stitching the Seam,the title of my solo show at the Orlando Museum of Art that opened on March 6, 2014, refers to the multitude of feelings that connect me to the minutiae of everyday, to the tragic and spectacular of the bigger planet we endeavor to call home.

location

X
  • Born: USA
  • Based: Berlin, Germany
  • Also Based in: Washington, DC, USA

comments

X

Fukushima

Isabel Manalo

2014 Photos, acrylic, enamel on gessoboard 24” x 36” Courtesy of the artist Collection of Zöe Charlton, Baltimore, MD

contributor

X

Isabel Manalo

b. 1968
image description
  • See All Works
  • visit website

Isabel Manalo is a multi-media visual artist, educator and curator. From 2000 - 2012, Isabel taught at American University's Department of Art both as an Adjunct and Visiting Assistant Professor. She served on the Board of Directors and the Visual Arts Committee for the District of Columbia Arts Center from 2010 - 2012. Her work is represented in Washington D.C. by Addison Ripley Fine Art where she has had two solo shows in 2009 and 2012 and now 2015. This past spring she exhibited a site specific installation at the new works gallery at the Orlando Museum of Art. She is also preparing for a solo exhibit at the Paul Zuccaire Gallery at the University of Stonybrook, Long Island, NY for February 2016. 

Isabel is also an Independent Curator and the Founder and Director of The Studio Visit (TSV), an online art journal featuring artists in their studios. Her experience as an academic educator inspired the creation of TSV in 2008. The focus on studio practice and process is the emphasis of TSV and further empasizes this mission through the art critique -- a fundamental social dialogue that balances the necessary solitary nature of independent studio rigor. Please see TSV's website to find out more about both the virtual and physical programming TSV offers.

She is currently living and working in Berlin where she served in 2012 -2013 as a Visiting Artist and Curator at Takt International Artist Residency where she conducts weekly art critiques and seminars for the artists in residence and curated them in group shows. Her expertise, scholarship and passion support and promote visual artists working in all mediums and career levels. In July 2011, She curated a group show in Washington D.C. at Addison Ripley Fine Art called "CultureScape" featuring the work of five emerging artists: Mei Mei Chang, Bridget Sue Lambert, Lisa Blas, Hedieh Ilchi and Elise Richman. She recently curated "Outside In" this past October 2012, a site specific installation that was on view this past October in Berlin executed by two Washington D.C. artists Megan Muller and Sam Scharf.

As an artist, Isabel has been showing her work internationally since 1999.  Her work is a part of numerous private and public collections including the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, the permanent collections of the US Embassies in Bulgaria, Kazakhtsan and Nepal to name a few. Her work has been shown at the McLean Project for the Arts, Arlington Art Center, Maryland Art Place, the Katzen Arts Center, and the Corcoran Gallery of Art and has been the subject of group and solo shows in Baltimore, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Philadelphia and New York. She was featured in New American Paintings in 2004 and 2006 and was awarded a Fellowship at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts in 2008, 2009 and 2011 with support from the Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation for 2009. Manalo's work is included in the Drawing Center and White Columns curated artist registries.

Isabel received her MFA in Painting from Yale University, a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a BA from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

My work has become more about the hand and less about the image. It is less about the abstraction of space but rather the abstraction of language and the  image of the Baybayin as manifest with thread and collage on different surfaces of paper. Using the pre-colonial alphabet from the Philippines -- called the Baybayin -- is a way to communicate my deepest thoughts through the written word, yet in a script that isn’t used anymore nor can be read or necessarily accessed by the general public. While it is clearly a written form, the process becomes visual for me.
 
I stitch the calligraphic lines as if I was stitching a wound. The process of sewing reminds me of my mother and the endless hours she spent sewing dresses for my sisters and myself. It was a large part of her identity and by including the sewing; it makes her present in this body of work almost akin to painting a narrative portrait of her.
 
Paint becomes blisters; photographs are cut and glued like pretty Band-Aids we see at the local drug stores. It resolves into a tactile discomfort of thread, knots, paint boils and cut paper that evokes a life that is uncontrolled, but hoping to be beautiful, somehow. Stitching the Seam,the title of my solo show at the Orlando Museum of Art that opened on March 6, 2014, refers to the multitude of feelings that connect me to the minutiae of everyday, to the tragic and spectacular of the bigger planet we endeavor to call home.

location

X
  • Born: USA
  • Based: Berlin, Germany
  • Also Based in: Washington, DC, USA

comments

X

contributor

X

Jeffrey Arellano Cabusao

Jeffrey Arellano Cabusao is an Associate Professor in the Department of English and Cultural Studies at Bryant University (Smithfield, Rhode Island).  During the 2006-2007 academic year, he was a Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in the Department of English at Kalamazoo College (Michigan).  He received a 2011 Early Career Educator of Color Leadership Award from the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE). His teaching and research focus on U.S. Ethnic Studies (specifically comparative approaches to Asian American and African American Studies), Cultural Studies (literary and cultural theory, critical pedagogies), and Women’s Studies (feminist movement and social change).

location

X
  • Born: Honolulu, HI, USA
  • Based: Smithfield, RI, USA

comments

X

Defend the Right to Land

Enrico Maniago

2012 Acrylic on canvas; collaboration with Panaghiusa 8 ft. x 4 ft. Courtesy of Enrico Maniago / Habi Arts

contributor

X

Enrico Maniago

b. 1978
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Enrico Maniago is a Philippine-born artist who was transplanted to the United States before his teens.

location

X
  • Born: The Philippines
  • Based: USA

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In Case of Emergency

Rodrigo Dela Peña, Jr.

2014 Poetry Courtesy of Rodrigo Dela Peña, Jr.

contributor

X

Rodrigo Dela Peña, Jr.

b. 1981
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Rodrigo V. Dela Peña Jr. is a Filipino writer based in Singapore. His poems have been published in the Quarterly Literary Review Singapore, Kartika Review: An Asian American Literary Arts Journal, The Guardian, Philippines Graphic, Philippine Daily Inquirer, and other journals and anthologies. He works as a marketing communications specialist.

In Case of Emergency seeks to explore how disasters (natural, personal, collective) shape our lives. Through different poetic forms such as the villanelle and prose poem, the collection illustrates calamities as decisive moments of survival, a prism that sheds light about the human condition.

location

X
  • Born: The Philippines
  • Based: Singapore
  • Also Based in: La Union, Philippines

comments

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Untitled

Nana Buxani

2014 - 2014 Photography Courtesy of Nana Buxani Location: Basey, Samar

contributor

X

Nana Buxani

b. 1966

Born in conflict-ridden region of Mindanao, Philippines in 1966, Nana Buxani  is a documentary photographer, filmmaker and painter whose work largely deals on  issues such as child labour, children and women in difficult situations, children in detention, the plight of homeless peoples, communities in war torn regions, the indigeneous peoples and their claim to ancestral domain rights, and people engaged in cooperative building. 
 
Nana has done works both films and stills photography for OXFAM-UK, the International Labour Organization particularly for the International Program on the Elimination of  Child Labour (IPEC), VSO-uk, UNICEF, Save the Children Organizations, the Women’s Health and Safe Motherhood Program, under the European Union Cooperation in the Philippines, The Consuelo Algers Foundation, Amnesty International UK, Christian Aid, PHILCOCHED (an NGO working on issues of people with disabilities), the Kaliwat Theatre Collective, The National Confederation of Cooperatives in the Philippines (NATCCO network), The Internet Society (Geneva)
 
She has done assignments for Time Magazine (Asia Edition), the Chronicle of Philantrophy and Higher Education ( Washington, DC), Interviu Magazine (Spain), Il Venerdi ( Italy), Marie Claire (London) Newsbreak (Philippines), I Magazine (PCIJ,  Philippines), ME Magazine (Philippines), The Guardian (UK), Helsingin Sanomat (Finland), The BUND Magazine (Shanghai), The New York Times (NYC), The National (UAE), Bloomberg News.

location

X
  • Born: Mindanao, Philippines
  • Based: Quezon City, Philippines

comments

X