topic

Environment

“Eating is the act of ingesting the environment.” -- Naomichi Ishige (qtd. in Fernandez, "Culture Ingested")

 

"[S]low violence ... occurs gradually and out of sight, a violence of delayed destruction that is dispersed across time and space, an attritional violence that is typically not viewed as violence at all. ... [Slow violence] is neither spectacular nor instantaneous, but rather incremental and accretive, its calamitous repercussions playing out across a range of temporal scales" like "[c]limate change, the thawing cryosphere, toxic drift, biomagnification, deforestation, the radioactive aftermaths of wars, acidifying oceans, and a host of other slowly unfolding environmental catastrophes." -- Rob Nixon, Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor (2011)

Sampal-OK

Francis Estrada

2014 Gouache, collage, charcoal, and gold leaf on paper and vellum 11" x 14" Courtesy of the artist

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Francis Estrada

b. 1975

Born in the Philipines and currently residing in Brooklyn, Francis Estrada is a visual artist, museum educator at the Museum of Modern Art, and freelance educator of Filipino art and culture. Francis has a fine arts degree in painting and drawing from San Jose State University, and he has taught in a variety of studio, classroom, and museum settings to diverse audiences, including programs for adults with disabilities, cultural institutions, and after-school programs. He was also an administrator and educator at the Museum for African Art, where he enjoyed teaching about the amalgamation of art and culture through objects. Francis exhibits his work nationally, including online publications. His work focuses on culture, history, and perception.

I investigate relationships between characters and their environment. I incorporate pieces of personal, historic and/or ethnographic photographs, text, and motifs (most of which broach the combined themes of history, sentimentality, and nostalgia).  Using some or all of these pieces, I compose scenarios with which I find personal connections then arrange them without providing a complete image or narrative. By de-contextualizing visual images (figures, symbols, motifs) from their original source, I attempt to create an ambiguous space for the viewer to complete. I interrogate how context is created through combinations of these visual elements.  How does the viewer identify with the images presented, and does the composition create a narrative?  How do the combinations of images create notions of space, place, history, identity, or memory?  By creating drawings that assimilate text, photographic reproductions, and symbols, I provide the viewer with a space in which they can decipher the visual clues and “complete” the work.

My art is a tool through which I confront how our understandings of culture are mediated, and the methods through which history and memory are created and perpetuated. I think of my work as "partial portraits" that are activated by the viewer.

I believe that my work speaks to the theme of Storm: A Typhoon Haiyan Recovery Project by connecting to how the media represented the country through images from the aftermath of the storm.  Also, various fundraising events brought out a vast array of artists and performers who used their talent to share Filipino customs (dance, song, martial arts).  Between the media and these events, people were able to see and experience various aspects of Filipino culture.  I feel that my drawings similarly portray various aspects of Philippine culture through the images that I choose to show. 

location

X
  • Born: Manila, Philippines
  • Based: Brooklyn, NY, USA

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Chance for Change

Chelo Aestrid XienHow

2014 Music video 4m 44s Courtesy of LivenFire Records and Chelo Aestrid

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Chelo Aestrid

b. 1980
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Chelo Aestrid is a Cebu-born, LA-raised, London-educated, and Manila-residing singer, dancer, host, writer, designer, actress, and entrepreneur. With powerful vocals, energetic dance moves, thought-provoking lyrics, funky style, and fun stage persona, she loves to thrill any crowd. She has performed in Asia, North America, and Europe and has opened for international acts such as Justin Timberlake, Ne-Yo, Timbaland, Nicki Minaj, and Pussycat Dolls. She has toured in Southeast Asia as an adidas Originals sponsored host with urban music legends Ali Shaheed Muhammad of Tribe Called Quest, Maceo of De La Soul, Tony Touch, and the Triple Threat DJ’s. She received “Best Dance Recording” from the Awit Awards, “Female Style Icon” and “Best Music Video” from the Urban Music Awards in Manila. She is a founding member of the Philippine Allstars, the two-time World Hip-hop Dance Champions. She also has experience in acting (TVCs and feature film), hosting, modeling (print), teaching dance, and organizing events. She is a founder of the clothing lines Capital G and BY:CHelo; and of the webstore BarongWarehouse.com, which sells quality barong tagalong at the lowest prices. She has studied Performing Arts, Architecture, and Fashion Design, and she finished a First Honours (Summa Cum Laude) Business Administration degree at Middlesex University, London, U.K. Lastly, she has been involved in non-profit organizations such as Gawad Kalinga, Child Hope, Rock Ed, Greenpeace, and Change.org. She also volunteered for disaster relief efforts including personally raising funds for her provincial hometown of Cebu after Typhoon Haiyan, which led to the creation of the song and foundation “Chance for Change” with XienHow.

Note: Chelo Aestrid collaborated with XienHow on the music video Chance for Change, which CA+T republished in its online exhibition Storm.

In November 2013, Typhoon Yolanda/Haiyan devastated most of the Visayas region of the Philippines. Thanks to many friends across the world we were able to provide some assistance to people who lost their homes in Borbon, Cebu. The job is not done, but we wanted to show you a great place to start helping the families already affected, and we wanted to create a sustainable platform for future funding for families affected by natural disasters. We started the CHANCE FOR CHANGE FOUNDATION and created a music video to show the sunny smiles of the Filipinos that never fade regardless of the challenges they face.

As a renaissance artist and a businesswoman, Chelo Aestrid is always striving to be her best self in any given situation through perseverance, passion, and positivity. She has been blessed to be able to do what she’s done so far, and only wishes to continue the good work and help others achieve their own highest potential. 

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XienHow

b. 1981
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XienHow was born Zen Seville and has had a very interesting life to say the least. Having moved 30 plus times by the time he was twelve, from Baja California all the way up to the Bay Area, he has a perspective that only people who have spent a lot of time traveling can have. Coming from parents with a spiritual background and belief system, he is very open minded and identifies himself as a spiritual person.  Having spent the greater part of the last 15 plus years honing his artistic talents and simultaneously working a full time “career job” in the construction industry, he is considered by many as an active member of many philanthropic and artistic circles. His professional experience has allowed him to develop an outstanding work ethic, which in turn helped him fund a lot of the community work and artistic platforms he continuously has provided to artistic communities throughout his career. In 2006, XienHow made his first trip to the Philippines where he fell in love with her people and culture. He has returned 13 times since then and has worked with the local entrepreneurs/philanthropists “Konektado” to continue creating positive and productive outlets and platforms for the people. Through his working relationship with Konektado, he met Chelo Aestrid, which is how the “Chance for Change” collaboration came to life. 

XienHow is an artist who focuses his music on the positive development of the mind and on changing the way people view their lives. He draws on the pain, struggles, and successes of his life to make music that he spreads on a global scale. He has worked with many legendary artists throughout the industry and has toured throughout the world and continues to do so. He is willing to work with other people with the same dedicated hard working ethical understanding. He works in the light of God and will not waver at the hands of darkness.

location

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  • Born: USA
  • Based: San Francisco, CA, USA

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Next Month’s Storm

Joel Kahn

Oct 14, 2014 Article Courtesy of Joel Kahn

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Joel Kahn

b. 1957
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I served in the US Navy as a weather observer right out of high school. After the service, I did various kinds of activities with computers. Now I am working with algorithmic digital art involving computer programming languages and mathematics.

I have a strong interest in the effects of technology, both positive and negative. I particularly try to explore areas that have received too little attention.

location

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  • Born: Orange, CA, USA
  • Based: Bolivar, MO

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Engkantada

Dindo Llana

2009 Acrylic on wood 2' x 4' Courtesy of Dindo Llana

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Dindo Llana

b. 1965
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I was born and grew up eating pakbet and bagnet in the Northern province of the Philippines, Ilocos Norte. I studied at the Philippine High School for the Arts in the kingdom of the deity Maria Makiling, Mount Makiling. It was there where I learned art. I took up fine arts at the University of the Philippines, Diliman where I was politicized and exposed to the other side of the Marcos regime. Hailing from Marcoslandia and spending four years of high school in an Imelda Marcos project playing angklung and banduria for Imelda dignitary visitors, it was at UP where I was awakened with the socio-political realities of the country at that time. I went on to work for multi-national companies in the advertising industry for more than two decades as an art director, selling consumer products from shampoo and deodorants to motor oils to food and beverages to cooperative banks. I worked on the side on book illustrations and designs garnering the Book Designer of the Year at the National Awards in 1998 and finalist for Best Children’s Book Award in 1996. I was awarded the Bronze Medal in the Art Association of the Philippine Painting Competition in 1995. I had my first Solo Exhibit in 1996, and I was censored several times after that in succeeding exhibitions because of the socio-political content of my works. They were socio-political satires of the Philippines. People in power in the Philippines just don’t have the sense of humor! I’ve stopped painting for a while until I was awarded with an art grant from the Asian Cultural Council in 2009. I’ve just retired from advertising, and I’m going to take Masters Studies in Anthropology. I’m starting in the art scene all over again.

This was the artist statement for the exhibit “Impakto” in 1999 at Ayala Museum where the works I’m submitting were part of:

Aswang. Tikbalang. Tiyanak. Mangkukulam. Sirena. Kapre. Engkanto. Nuno sa Punso.

We are afraid of them. They are our nightmare, these creatures of darkness. Mga IMPAKTO - the entities of nature: the mountains, forests, rivers, seas and the underground.

We are very afraid of them. They are the forces of unexplainable malevolence. We create devices to counter them. We appease them with offerings. We ask permission to enter their domain: “Tabi-tabi po! They serve as social controls, guardians of nature.

We are very very afraid of them. They harm us and make us ill.

But perhaps they are more afraid of us! We do more harm to their world. For the past 100 years, we have destroyed about 75% of their forests. We wrecked havoc on their mountains and coral reefs. We continue to poison their rivers, lakes and seas.

Who should be more afraid, us or them? Sino ang IMPAKTO, sila o tayo?

location

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  • Born: Badoc, Ilocos Norte
  • Based: Quezon City, Philippines

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Sirena

Dindo Llana

2009 Acrylic on wood 2' x 4' Courtesy of Dindo Llana

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Dindo Llana

b. 1965
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I was born and grew up eating pakbet and bagnet in the Northern province of the Philippines, Ilocos Norte. I studied at the Philippine High School for the Arts in the kingdom of the deity Maria Makiling, Mount Makiling. It was there where I learned art. I took up fine arts at the University of the Philippines, Diliman where I was politicized and exposed to the other side of the Marcos regime. Hailing from Marcoslandia and spending four years of high school in an Imelda Marcos project playing angklung and banduria for Imelda dignitary visitors, it was at UP where I was awakened with the socio-political realities of the country at that time. I went on to work for multi-national companies in the advertising industry for more than two decades as an art director, selling consumer products from shampoo and deodorants to motor oils to food and beverages to cooperative banks. I worked on the side on book illustrations and designs garnering the Book Designer of the Year at the National Awards in 1998 and finalist for Best Children’s Book Award in 1996. I was awarded the Bronze Medal in the Art Association of the Philippine Painting Competition in 1995. I had my first Solo Exhibit in 1996, and I was censored several times after that in succeeding exhibitions because of the socio-political content of my works. They were socio-political satires of the Philippines. People in power in the Philippines just don’t have the sense of humor! I’ve stopped painting for a while until I was awarded with an art grant from the Asian Cultural Council in 2009. I’ve just retired from advertising, and I’m going to take Masters Studies in Anthropology. I’m starting in the art scene all over again.

This was the artist statement for the exhibit “Impakto” in 1999 at Ayala Museum where the works I’m submitting were part of:

Aswang. Tikbalang. Tiyanak. Mangkukulam. Sirena. Kapre. Engkanto. Nuno sa Punso.

We are afraid of them. They are our nightmare, these creatures of darkness. Mga IMPAKTO - the entities of nature: the mountains, forests, rivers, seas and the underground.

We are very afraid of them. They are the forces of unexplainable malevolence. We create devices to counter them. We appease them with offerings. We ask permission to enter their domain: “Tabi-tabi po! They serve as social controls, guardians of nature.

We are very very afraid of them. They harm us and make us ill.

But perhaps they are more afraid of us! We do more harm to their world. For the past 100 years, we have destroyed about 75% of their forests. We wrecked havoc on their mountains and coral reefs. We continue to poison their rivers, lakes and seas.

Who should be more afraid, us or them? Sino ang IMPAKTO, sila o tayo?

location

X
  • Born: Badoc, Ilocos Norte
  • Based: Quezon City, Philippines

comments

X

Manananggal

Dindo Llana

1999 Acrylic on wood 2' x 4' Courtesy of Dindo Llana

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X

Dindo Llana

b. 1965
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I was born and grew up eating pakbet and bagnet in the Northern province of the Philippines, Ilocos Norte. I studied at the Philippine High School for the Arts in the kingdom of the deity Maria Makiling, Mount Makiling. It was there where I learned art. I took up fine arts at the University of the Philippines, Diliman where I was politicized and exposed to the other side of the Marcos regime. Hailing from Marcoslandia and spending four years of high school in an Imelda Marcos project playing angklung and banduria for Imelda dignitary visitors, it was at UP where I was awakened with the socio-political realities of the country at that time. I went on to work for multi-national companies in the advertising industry for more than two decades as an art director, selling consumer products from shampoo and deodorants to motor oils to food and beverages to cooperative banks. I worked on the side on book illustrations and designs garnering the Book Designer of the Year at the National Awards in 1998 and finalist for Best Children’s Book Award in 1996. I was awarded the Bronze Medal in the Art Association of the Philippine Painting Competition in 1995. I had my first Solo Exhibit in 1996, and I was censored several times after that in succeeding exhibitions because of the socio-political content of my works. They were socio-political satires of the Philippines. People in power in the Philippines just don’t have the sense of humor! I’ve stopped painting for a while until I was awarded with an art grant from the Asian Cultural Council in 2009. I’ve just retired from advertising, and I’m going to take Masters Studies in Anthropology. I’m starting in the art scene all over again.

This was the artist statement for the exhibit “Impakto” in 1999 at Ayala Museum where the works I’m submitting were part of:

Aswang. Tikbalang. Tiyanak. Mangkukulam. Sirena. Kapre. Engkanto. Nuno sa Punso.

We are afraid of them. They are our nightmare, these creatures of darkness. Mga IMPAKTO - the entities of nature: the mountains, forests, rivers, seas and the underground.

We are very afraid of them. They are the forces of unexplainable malevolence. We create devices to counter them. We appease them with offerings. We ask permission to enter their domain: “Tabi-tabi po! They serve as social controls, guardians of nature.

We are very very afraid of them. They harm us and make us ill.

But perhaps they are more afraid of us! We do more harm to their world. For the past 100 years, we have destroyed about 75% of their forests. We wrecked havoc on their mountains and coral reefs. We continue to poison their rivers, lakes and seas.

Who should be more afraid, us or them? Sino ang IMPAKTO, sila o tayo?

location

X
  • Born: Badoc, Ilocos Norte
  • Based: Quezon City, Philippines

comments

X

Stormed

Fran Atopos Conte

Jun 2014 Video documentary 39m 49s Courtesy of Fran Atopos Conte

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Fran Atopos Conte

b. 1981
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Fran Atopos is a graduate of Philosophy and Political Science, professional journalist since 2009. Avid traveler, he published two travel books, about Brazil and Libya. He is very interested in the Philippines, where he spent a few months.

Fran is the founder of an art collective called Atopos and is very fond of collaborating with other artists and filmmakers.

“Stormed” is about two natural disasters in the Philippines: Sendong, and Haiyan. The documentary is divided in two parts, the first taking place in Cagayan de Oro, Mindanao, and the second part showing the disaster caused by Haiyan in the island of Bantayan, in Cebu. 
 
Narratively, “Stormed” acts like an impersonal documentary in the first part, while taking a more character driven story feature in the latter part, dedicated to the reconstruction in Bantayan after Haiyan.
 
“Stormed” features interviews with survivors, academics and two activists from a Bantayan NGO called “Back to Sea”. The Cagayan de Oro part was filmed with the local support of Cdo director Joe Bacus and film makers Jeffrie Po, Mona Sun and Learon Dekada.

location

X
  • Born: Florence, Italy
  • Based: Rome, Italy

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Flash Flood

Isabel Manalo

2010 Photographs and acrylic on Yupo paper 22" x 30" Courtesy of the artist

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Isabel Manalo

b. 1968
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Isabel Manalo is a multi-media visual artist, educator and curator. From 2000 - 2012, Isabel taught at American University's Department of Art both as an Adjunct and Visiting Assistant Professor. She served on the Board of Directors and the Visual Arts Committee for the District of Columbia Arts Center from 2010 - 2012. Her work is represented in Washington D.C. by Addison Ripley Fine Art where she has had two solo shows in 2009 and 2012 and now 2015. This past spring she exhibited a site specific installation at the new works gallery at the Orlando Museum of Art. She is also preparing for a solo exhibit at the Paul Zuccaire Gallery at the University of Stonybrook, Long Island, NY for February 2016. 

Isabel is also an Independent Curator and the Founder and Director of The Studio Visit (TSV), an online art journal featuring artists in their studios. Her experience as an academic educator inspired the creation of TSV in 2008. The focus on studio practice and process is the emphasis of TSV and further empasizes this mission through the art critique -- a fundamental social dialogue that balances the necessary solitary nature of independent studio rigor. Please see TSV's website to find out more about both the virtual and physical programming TSV offers.

She is currently living and working in Berlin where she served in 2012 -2013 as a Visiting Artist and Curator at Takt International Artist Residency where she conducts weekly art critiques and seminars for the artists in residence and curated them in group shows. Her expertise, scholarship and passion support and promote visual artists working in all mediums and career levels. In July 2011, She curated a group show in Washington D.C. at Addison Ripley Fine Art called "CultureScape" featuring the work of five emerging artists: Mei Mei Chang, Bridget Sue Lambert, Lisa Blas, Hedieh Ilchi and Elise Richman. She recently curated "Outside In" this past October 2012, a site specific installation that was on view this past October in Berlin executed by two Washington D.C. artists Megan Muller and Sam Scharf.

As an artist, Isabel has been showing her work internationally since 1999.  Her work is a part of numerous private and public collections including the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, the permanent collections of the US Embassies in Bulgaria, Kazakhtsan and Nepal to name a few. Her work has been shown at the McLean Project for the Arts, Arlington Art Center, Maryland Art Place, the Katzen Arts Center, and the Corcoran Gallery of Art and has been the subject of group and solo shows in Baltimore, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Philadelphia and New York. She was featured in New American Paintings in 2004 and 2006 and was awarded a Fellowship at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts in 2008, 2009 and 2011 with support from the Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation for 2009. Manalo's work is included in the Drawing Center and White Columns curated artist registries.

Isabel received her MFA in Painting from Yale University, a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a BA from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

My work has become more about the hand and less about the image. It is less about the abstraction of space but rather the abstraction of language and the  image of the Baybayin as manifest with thread and collage on different surfaces of paper. Using the pre-colonial alphabet from the Philippines -- called the Baybayin -- is a way to communicate my deepest thoughts through the written word, yet in a script that isn’t used anymore nor can be read or necessarily accessed by the general public. While it is clearly a written form, the process becomes visual for me.
 
I stitch the calligraphic lines as if I was stitching a wound. The process of sewing reminds me of my mother and the endless hours she spent sewing dresses for my sisters and myself. It was a large part of her identity and by including the sewing; it makes her present in this body of work almost akin to painting a narrative portrait of her.
 
Paint becomes blisters; photographs are cut and glued like pretty Band-Aids we see at the local drug stores. It resolves into a tactile discomfort of thread, knots, paint boils and cut paper that evokes a life that is uncontrolled, but hoping to be beautiful, somehow. Stitching the Seam,the title of my solo show at the Orlando Museum of Art that opened on March 6, 2014, refers to the multitude of feelings that connect me to the minutiae of everyday, to the tragic and spectacular of the bigger planet we endeavor to call home.

location

X
  • Born: USA
  • Based: Berlin, Germany
  • Also Based in: Washington, DC, USA

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Montana Burning

Isabel Manalo

2009 Acrylic and enamel on gessoboard 30" x 30" Courtesy of the artist Collection of the U.S. Embassy in the Philippines

contributor

X

Isabel Manalo

b. 1968
image description
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Isabel Manalo is a multi-media visual artist, educator and curator. From 2000 - 2012, Isabel taught at American University's Department of Art both as an Adjunct and Visiting Assistant Professor. She served on the Board of Directors and the Visual Arts Committee for the District of Columbia Arts Center from 2010 - 2012. Her work is represented in Washington D.C. by Addison Ripley Fine Art where she has had two solo shows in 2009 and 2012 and now 2015. This past spring she exhibited a site specific installation at the new works gallery at the Orlando Museum of Art. She is also preparing for a solo exhibit at the Paul Zuccaire Gallery at the University of Stonybrook, Long Island, NY for February 2016. 

Isabel is also an Independent Curator and the Founder and Director of The Studio Visit (TSV), an online art journal featuring artists in their studios. Her experience as an academic educator inspired the creation of TSV in 2008. The focus on studio practice and process is the emphasis of TSV and further empasizes this mission through the art critique -- a fundamental social dialogue that balances the necessary solitary nature of independent studio rigor. Please see TSV's website to find out more about both the virtual and physical programming TSV offers.

She is currently living and working in Berlin where she served in 2012 -2013 as a Visiting Artist and Curator at Takt International Artist Residency where she conducts weekly art critiques and seminars for the artists in residence and curated them in group shows. Her expertise, scholarship and passion support and promote visual artists working in all mediums and career levels. In July 2011, She curated a group show in Washington D.C. at Addison Ripley Fine Art called "CultureScape" featuring the work of five emerging artists: Mei Mei Chang, Bridget Sue Lambert, Lisa Blas, Hedieh Ilchi and Elise Richman. She recently curated "Outside In" this past October 2012, a site specific installation that was on view this past October in Berlin executed by two Washington D.C. artists Megan Muller and Sam Scharf.

As an artist, Isabel has been showing her work internationally since 1999.  Her work is a part of numerous private and public collections including the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, the permanent collections of the US Embassies in Bulgaria, Kazakhtsan and Nepal to name a few. Her work has been shown at the McLean Project for the Arts, Arlington Art Center, Maryland Art Place, the Katzen Arts Center, and the Corcoran Gallery of Art and has been the subject of group and solo shows in Baltimore, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Philadelphia and New York. She was featured in New American Paintings in 2004 and 2006 and was awarded a Fellowship at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts in 2008, 2009 and 2011 with support from the Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation for 2009. Manalo's work is included in the Drawing Center and White Columns curated artist registries.

Isabel received her MFA in Painting from Yale University, a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a BA from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

My work has become more about the hand and less about the image. It is less about the abstraction of space but rather the abstraction of language and the  image of the Baybayin as manifest with thread and collage on different surfaces of paper. Using the pre-colonial alphabet from the Philippines -- called the Baybayin -- is a way to communicate my deepest thoughts through the written word, yet in a script that isn’t used anymore nor can be read or necessarily accessed by the general public. While it is clearly a written form, the process becomes visual for me.
 
I stitch the calligraphic lines as if I was stitching a wound. The process of sewing reminds me of my mother and the endless hours she spent sewing dresses for my sisters and myself. It was a large part of her identity and by including the sewing; it makes her present in this body of work almost akin to painting a narrative portrait of her.
 
Paint becomes blisters; photographs are cut and glued like pretty Band-Aids we see at the local drug stores. It resolves into a tactile discomfort of thread, knots, paint boils and cut paper that evokes a life that is uncontrolled, but hoping to be beautiful, somehow. Stitching the Seam,the title of my solo show at the Orlando Museum of Art that opened on March 6, 2014, refers to the multitude of feelings that connect me to the minutiae of everyday, to the tragic and spectacular of the bigger planet we endeavor to call home.

location

X
  • Born: USA
  • Based: Berlin, Germany
  • Also Based in: Washington, DC, USA

comments

X

Haiti

Isabel Manalo

2010 Acrylic and photographs on mylar 11” x 14” Courtesy of the artist

contributor

X

Isabel Manalo

b. 1968
image description
  • See All Works
  • visit website

Isabel Manalo is a multi-media visual artist, educator and curator. From 2000 - 2012, Isabel taught at American University's Department of Art both as an Adjunct and Visiting Assistant Professor. She served on the Board of Directors and the Visual Arts Committee for the District of Columbia Arts Center from 2010 - 2012. Her work is represented in Washington D.C. by Addison Ripley Fine Art where she has had two solo shows in 2009 and 2012 and now 2015. This past spring she exhibited a site specific installation at the new works gallery at the Orlando Museum of Art. She is also preparing for a solo exhibit at the Paul Zuccaire Gallery at the University of Stonybrook, Long Island, NY for February 2016. 

Isabel is also an Independent Curator and the Founder and Director of The Studio Visit (TSV), an online art journal featuring artists in their studios. Her experience as an academic educator inspired the creation of TSV in 2008. The focus on studio practice and process is the emphasis of TSV and further empasizes this mission through the art critique -- a fundamental social dialogue that balances the necessary solitary nature of independent studio rigor. Please see TSV's website to find out more about both the virtual and physical programming TSV offers.

She is currently living and working in Berlin where she served in 2012 -2013 as a Visiting Artist and Curator at Takt International Artist Residency where she conducts weekly art critiques and seminars for the artists in residence and curated them in group shows. Her expertise, scholarship and passion support and promote visual artists working in all mediums and career levels. In July 2011, She curated a group show in Washington D.C. at Addison Ripley Fine Art called "CultureScape" featuring the work of five emerging artists: Mei Mei Chang, Bridget Sue Lambert, Lisa Blas, Hedieh Ilchi and Elise Richman. She recently curated "Outside In" this past October 2012, a site specific installation that was on view this past October in Berlin executed by two Washington D.C. artists Megan Muller and Sam Scharf.

As an artist, Isabel has been showing her work internationally since 1999.  Her work is a part of numerous private and public collections including the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, the permanent collections of the US Embassies in Bulgaria, Kazakhtsan and Nepal to name a few. Her work has been shown at the McLean Project for the Arts, Arlington Art Center, Maryland Art Place, the Katzen Arts Center, and the Corcoran Gallery of Art and has been the subject of group and solo shows in Baltimore, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Philadelphia and New York. She was featured in New American Paintings in 2004 and 2006 and was awarded a Fellowship at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts in 2008, 2009 and 2011 with support from the Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation for 2009. Manalo's work is included in the Drawing Center and White Columns curated artist registries.

Isabel received her MFA in Painting from Yale University, a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a BA from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

My work has become more about the hand and less about the image. It is less about the abstraction of space but rather the abstraction of language and the  image of the Baybayin as manifest with thread and collage on different surfaces of paper. Using the pre-colonial alphabet from the Philippines -- called the Baybayin -- is a way to communicate my deepest thoughts through the written word, yet in a script that isn’t used anymore nor can be read or necessarily accessed by the general public. While it is clearly a written form, the process becomes visual for me.
 
I stitch the calligraphic lines as if I was stitching a wound. The process of sewing reminds me of my mother and the endless hours she spent sewing dresses for my sisters and myself. It was a large part of her identity and by including the sewing; it makes her present in this body of work almost akin to painting a narrative portrait of her.
 
Paint becomes blisters; photographs are cut and glued like pretty Band-Aids we see at the local drug stores. It resolves into a tactile discomfort of thread, knots, paint boils and cut paper that evokes a life that is uncontrolled, but hoping to be beautiful, somehow. Stitching the Seam,the title of my solo show at the Orlando Museum of Art that opened on March 6, 2014, refers to the multitude of feelings that connect me to the minutiae of everyday, to the tragic and spectacular of the bigger planet we endeavor to call home.

location

X
  • Born: USA
  • Based: Berlin, Germany
  • Also Based in: Washington, DC, USA

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